Massage Guns-Effective?

Anyone use one of these? I tried one today and liked it but, don’t know how effective a recovery aid they are…

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Do you need massage gun?

IDK. But, I could say that about so many things in this sport. From tires, to carbon, to supplements to clothes to components, we all are guilty of over consumption in hopes of a better feel, more performance etc…I ask because during the Tour of America’s Dairyland I used my team mates recovery boots. I thought they were amazing. When I returned home I was a little shocked to listen to coach Chad and others state that compression products in general were a waste of money.

So I held off buying a set. Then a tri buddy brings a gun over and I use it for a couple days and like the boots really like what I feel but, coach Chad is in the back of my head and I’m thinking snake oil.

Just seems like a cheaper easier more convenient way than paying for messages. Maybe those are snake oil too though? Like boots, messages, AMP lotion etc…it’s hard to quantify if they actually really help recovery. The gun felt a lot like trigger point message if you’ve ever experienced that. It’s painful until the muscle relaxes but, once it does relax it’s a very good thing.

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like this?

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Carbon grip? lol

I do utilize a percussion massager for recovery purposes and they work fantastic. As someone that did massage therapy for over 12 years I’ve always tried various recovery tools from foal rollers, sticks, various balls, etc. The two modalities that personally I have found the best return on investment are high end EMS machines such as GLOBUS (unit I own) or Compex and percussion massage gun/tool. I have used the normatec boots in past, but prefer the other modalities mentioned. Issue w/the massage guns can be the sound. For quite some time I just used a jigsaw w/a after market adapter so that can be used as a percussion massage tool. Problem is that is SO loud and heavy. Recently I purchased https://www.amazon.com/Powerful-Handheld-Massager-Percussion-Performance/dp/B07S187B6J/ref=sr_1_3?crid=1228OM1PBWOI6&keywords=lpysfw+massage+gun&qid=1563805088&s=gateway&sprefix=lpys%2Caps%2C133&sr=8-3
this model from LPYSW, another version of the hyperice hypervolt but at 1/2 cost. It is super quiet, works great, only about 2lbs so easy to hold and manipulate, multiple speed settings and comes w/4 different tips and also a 1 yr warranty. I would fully recommend one of these for recovery purposes. Also works great when after a long day of work and coming home to ride my legs feel heavy I can run the unit and then the legs feel fresh and ready to go. I’d say same w/the EMS machines as they have a great ‘warm up’ program and anytime I run that prior to a ride my legs feel primed and ready to go.

I hear people knock different things from time to time in regards to recovery. I would suggest you experiment and find what works for you and not let what others say influence your decisions. Just because someone may not be a compression sock fan doesn’t mean you find a benefit in them whether its more of a placebo (IE you feel your are doing something to improve your recovery thus gain benefits) or backed by research.

Best of luck

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@joeackerman great info! Thank you for your experience! I appreciate it. I forgot about EMS…SOP for PT applications and have used it extensively but, only after injury. Using it for routine recovery is something I just didn’t consider.

@Landis the specific recovery programs that are built into the globus and compex machines are awesome. The globus unit I have has a stretch/relax program, Active Recovery & Massage specific programs. That unit is a game changer to me. Other nice feature with it is the portability. If not driving you can run the warm up program on way to an event or begin using the recover programs on the drive home from a race, etc.

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@joeackerman thanks! The percussion gun you linked is super cheap! Relatively quiet?

@Landis Correct, its essentially 1/2 cost of Hypervolt/ Hyperice. Figured w/cost and warranty I was willing to take risk. It works great, construction is solid, I have to assume this comes from same factory that Hyperice does. You can press as hard as you want into an area and it will continue to percuss unlike other units that essentially stall out. In regards to noise its incredibly quiet. W/the jigsaw anytime I would go to use it my wife would give me the business that its too loud and to shut it off. This unit she doesn’t even flinch when it goes on. I believe it runs around 40 decibels. So quiet enough that you can use and watch TV w/out any issue.

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Oops, that’s a typo. I meant to say “Do you mean massage gun?” :face_with_hand_over_mouth:

In any case, to address your question I would say they all work (massage, boots, massage gun, I don’t know about lotion). Whether we can prove it scientifically is still being worked on, although massage has some scientific backing. How do you know it works? You feel better! Now, will it magically boost your FTP? Probably not by itself. However if you feel better and are able to do more, recover better, that’s a win.

Here’s my anecdote about massage guns. It’s been crucial with in my recovery from an injury. I have been suffering from a posterior tibialis tendonitis for about a 18 months and have done quite a lot of PT to work on it. Recently purchased a Hyperice Hypervolt and it worked beautifully. It’s like trigger point massage but less effort. I feel like it’s able to access certain spots that would be otherwise take a lot of work to get to and that’s where I find a lot of value. With the different heads I can work on all sorts of problem areas, such as the pointy one for going deep into the calf to get at the upper post tib to loosen it up or the flatter one to work on the anterior tibialis group. I feel like before getting the massage gun, being able to really dig in on those muscles were a lot of work and this has made the process much easier. Also what was really important for me was the discovery of trigger points. Before I wasn’t focusing so much on the anterior tibialis but one day as I was blasting away at my leg, I found a spot near the knee that was suuuper tight. Blasting at it has really helped alleviate my post tib pain and has been a game changer.

Now for the downside with regard to the Hyperice Hypervolt. Mine broke! I am asking for a warranty replacement at the moment. It no longer charges and the cheap little plastic on/off tab snapped off. I’ve only had it for a month and they should be replacing it. It’s just the battery section. That one is the best on the market as it’s powerful and importantly, it’s quite. All other massage guns seem to be super loud in comparison. It looks like that cheaper version on amazon would be a great alternative especially at half price. As long as it’s of the same build quality and as long as they honor their warranty I would probably go with the hypervolt knockoff.

Good luck.

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@Minty_One thx man! Good info. I corrected the title…ooops.

I ordered one that wasn’t too expensive today.

I have a Theragun. I actually created my own using a jigsaw and really liked it, but I ended up getting a deal on Theragun.

Anyway, they are pretty cheap to make so DIY it if you can.

I don’t know how much it aids with “recovery” but I use it a lot for flexibility. Before I started using it I couldn’t touch my toes and now I can put my palms on the floor. Also I get tension headaches and it’s good to take the tension out of my shoulders.

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I bought a Hypervolt this season and love it. Whether it increases performances is definitely up for debate but there is no question I feel better after using it.

For me, it’s the convenience. I keep it handy when relaxing in the evening watching something in TV. I then massage quads, hamstrings, hip flexors, calves etc. It gets rid of the stiff and aching feeling I sometimes get in the evenings after training earlier in the day. The HYPERVOLT, by holding a charge well and being super easy to use, is getting used a lot and I feel I’m getting value out of it.

In contrast, I bought a PowerDot last year on sale and have barely used it. Didn’t feel I got much benefit and more of a pain to set up and use.

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I purchased a PADO Purewave massager about 3 months ago and it has become an essential part of my recovery arsenal. I highly recommend this massager as it has different tips for different applications. I use it on my shoulders and neck after a long ride and also on my quads and IT bands. Everything just feels looser and more relaxed. Definitely well worth the money and if you use it instead of a human massage it will pay for itself very quickly.

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Yes, it is much more effective than muscle foam roller or roller stick. I bought a BigTron Massage Gun on Aamazon (https://amzn.to/2LB8VY2). You ever get those deep knots that a masseuse can’t get? Well let me tell you, this definitely will get it. It has various attachments depending on how deep or soft you want it to go into the muscles. I also used on my legs and it seems to be reducing the visibility of my cellulite. I remember seeing a different one advertised for double the price and I was so happy to see this price reasonably and with great quality. Very happy with this purchase!

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Hey -

Anyone who got this have any followup experiences? My wife is interested in one and I was curious. I know there aren’t any studies or anything, but I’m looking for some anecdotal experiences.

I’m looking at the Hypervolt Hyperice to buy…

I recently hooked up with TheRaGun as they are new into Australia. I have used it now on my quads, calf and my achillies. Last Thursday my legs were cooked, used it on the main muscle groups, watched some how to on YouTube etc. And next day they were a lot better, yes I eat healthily, stretch etc but I’ve been that burnt out before and recovery time was a day longer. The G3 gun has 3 different attachments, the sound was ok to me, wife thought it was a bit too loud (so turn the TV up). The handle makes it easier to hold in awkward positions on your back and neck. Has two speed settings, one is at 1000rpm, the other 2200. The first setting stimulates the muscles gets the blood flowing. The second is for the massage.

I also used it on my neck where I’ve had a pinched nerve for 4-6 weeks. If I turn my head left, I get a shooting pain in my bicep and into my forearm. After 10minutes, the next day it is 50% better.

Its now part of my recovery process, I feel better, muscles recover a bit quicker, does it do anything a massage wouldn’t. Probably not but we all don’t have access to a full time masseuse.

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Thanks Rob. It sounds like the kind of thing I’m looking for.

You mostly use it on yourself or have you managed to recruit your wife into the mix?

REI has their annual 20% off one item sale going on. I picked up the Hyperice Hypervolt and LOVE it.

It is great after workouts as massage and helps me get spots that I just can’t get as well with a foam roller, lacrosse balls or Theracane.

I have been pleasantly surprised that using it BEFORE workouts really helps.

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