What's So Bad About Pizza?

Hey everyone,

For such a long time I’ve heard about Pizza being a poor carb choice, and while I can completely see that for eating out and ordering from pizza chains… what about homemade pizza? Is it really that bad? I have a hard time thinking so…

Using >50% whole wheat flour in the dough (and making it thin crust), virgin olive oil, and using homemade sauce while going easy on the cheese, pizza seems to be one of the best carbohydrate and vegetable options there is. I used to eat pizza once per month, but began to eat homemade pizza 2-3 times per week last July and have gone from 200lbs to 168lbs since then (granted, it wasn’t all about the pizza).

I’m convinced that a properly made pizza has everything you need for a quality diet – whole grains, loads of veggies, a small amount of dairy, and the option to add lean protein as well.

Though since people say pizza is a bad carb choice, I don’t want to feel so guilty! What do you all think?

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:thinking:

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cauliflower crust and lots of veggies - pizza is the 5th food group!

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Life is too short to not eat pizza

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Words like cauliflower pineapple banana tuna and pizza do not belong together

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Definitely the key is the ingredients and how it is made. Your delicious sounding homemade pizza is a whole lot healthier than a greasy deep dish…

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:grin: Maybe it’s just the “western style pizza” that’s ruined it for everyone ? :thinking: A nice neapolitan pizza with whole wheat flour and homemade sauce… now I’m getting hungry…

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There is nothing inherent about pizza that makes it a bad carb choice. If eating homemade pizza regularly is working for you and allowing you to achieve your goals, then that’s all that matters. However, if someone interested in losing weight decided to order pizza 2-3 times per week, I highly doubt they will have the same success. Generally, pizza is easy to overeat because it tastes so good and has a lot of calories, especially greasy pizza ordered from a fast-food restaurant. For you to get the same amount of carbs eating rice, sweet potatoes, etc. vs pizza, you will only need to eat a small percentage of the calories due to the high amount of calories you are getting from fat with pizza.

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I go for the no oil veggie no cheese vegan pizza, it is phenomenal

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There’s a big nutritional difference between the kind of homemade pizza you’re making and what you’ll get at a fast food joint or your average restaurant.

In terms of fueling workouts, pizza is typically a high-fat option and you’re looking for predominantly carbs so reducing the fat is a good move in that regard.
In terms of general health, take out pizza has the same problems as most fast food- it’s made with poor quality ingredients, overly refined and processed, calorie dense, low on vegetables and has a high salt content.
Homemade pizza can absolutely be a great carb option, and it sounds like you’ve got that down pretty well. :pizza: :beer:

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who da thunk those were veggies!

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It’s Kids’ birthday party food.

Unless you’ve just done a 50 mile ride and then it’s awesome!

There are exactly zero scenarios in which Pizza is not awesome

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with beer its awesome squared!

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I agree with most comments I’ve read so far. I don’t know how you make pizza in the US and what ingredients you typically use, but in Italy it is as close to healthy food as you can get IF all your macros are in place.

It is just flour, water, yeast , salt, a spoonful of olive oil… You add some tomato sauce… preferably organic, some mozzarella (without going overboard) and that’s it.

Super scientific anecdotal evidence here: I went from 89Kg down to 72Kg in 10 months and I had pizza at least once or twice a week. No regrets… at all. :joy:

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With red wine and salad. :+1:

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I just made pizza at home over the weekend.

Sauce of tomato paste, garlic red wine. Topped pizza with sauteed eggplant, mushrooms, and carmelized onions, and just a sprinkling of cheese. Good pizza needs very little cheese IMO. Other than the cheese, just a little drizzle of olive oil is the only fat in there. I’ll keep track next time…but I have a feeing well made pizza on the lighter side has a pretty favorable macro nutrient breakdown.

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I eat pizza with the wife every Friday night because life is too damn short to worry about it. It’s my favorite food and I am damn good with my diet otherwise. If I dropped the Friday night pizza, I might go from 70.6kg to 70.2kg… but I’m 42, and Cat 4 road/AG triathlete, and usually burn 1100-1400 calories on Friday morning’s trainer session, so… I’ll have another slice… or two…

I don’t eat it for the health benefits. I eat it for the psychological ones!

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It’s also worth noting that high calorie =/= inherently bad for you. When I’m in a full training cycle, I struggle hard to get enough calories / carbs in.

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I think when people say “Pizza is bad” they really mean “North American style pizza is bad” An entire Neapolitan style pizza has about the same fat and calories as only 1-2 slices (depending on toppings) of a typical North American chain pizza. That’s not even considering Chicago/deep dish, or Detroit style/Pizza Hut.
My partner and I have started doing a weekly pizza and wine night while in social isolation. Making the pizzas while having some wine and chatting is a great way to unwind and connect. It also results in a fantastic meal. I use the same sourdough crust formula all the time, and have it saved as a recipe in myfitnesspal. Toppings change as we play around, but I just enter them into myfitnesspal as separate items and I know exactly what I’m eating. Generally it ends up similar in macros to a good pasta meal. If there were races to worry about, I’d probably reduce the wine to a glass, but keep the pizza.

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