Saddle sore right side

Hello all,

I keep getting a saddle sore on the right side, I’m using a Specialized power 155mm saddle, anyone got any advice on what the problem could be? Or potential things I can try.

Following - I have the same issue but on the left. Most of the time it’s “just” saddle soreness. Out on the road it doesn’t seem so much of an issue - it usually occurs with a period of indoor training.

My theory is it could be a leg length discrepancy, but I don’t want to/can’t really get a fit done at the moment.

I get this a bit - people tend to sit slightly to one side out of preference instead of squarely on the saddle. When I remember I just try to focus on sitting more level and use a bit more chamois cream on the side which is sore. This only happens on my road bike though…on my TT bike with the ISM saddle I am pretty square so it isn’t leg length in my case.

Yeah it’s a lot better outside but when I use the trainer and do my LV plan which is only 3.5 hours a week at the minute it seems to come back. I’m thinking about maybe lowering saddle height what you think?

Bike fitters I’ve seen have typically said that soreness on one side is because your saddle is too high and you are sitting off to one side. Along with saying most people ride with saddles too high in general.

Without a bike fit, no one can really advise you on this other than a good fitter.

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I have had a fit and he did put my saddle higher but I’ve not changed it since and these problems have only really come on after that fit.

I’m no expert on the matter, but had also thought about lowering my saddle on the trainer 1 or 2 mm.

Admittedly some of my bibs’ chamois have seen better days. It’s expensive, but I’m trying to refresh them over time to cover that base. I wore some brand new Assos Equipe RS yesterday, which felt great to be fair (although the soreness was already there from last week). I do think bibs and chamois cream are definitely secondary to fit though.

I just went through this. I had a more or less permanent saddle sore left where my hamstring meets my sitbone, on a Pro Stealth 155m (widest they had). But ONLY inside on my Tacx Neo 2.

When I bought the saddle, it already felt “hard”. But I’m the kinda guy that always things HTFU, so I just went with it.

Couple weeks ago, the sore was really becoming painful, and I asked around (here and amongst friends). I have relatively wide hips, so people recommended the Power Arc. I went to Specialized dealer, got the saddle, and it felt much better. I now have a 143mm if I’m correct. They used the plate on which you have to sit to measure saddle size.

I did some more homework, and a lot of people argue that without a rocker plate, you will get saddle sores or other minor injuries inside anyway at some point (when riding long) because of the static position you are in. And that’s what I experienced. The saddle sores started when I was 3-4h in-door on the bike trying to train endurance (because weather is shit outside).

Another thing to look into is your chamois. Is it wide enough in the right spots? I ride Endura Pro SL wide. Other bibs are often not wide enough, specially Castello, Specialized, and Fizik, which have relatively narrow chamois.

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True. But I had my bike fit checked and I was not sitting to one side any longer. They measured saddle pressure whilst on the bike. It WAS the case on my first bike fit a year ago, though. That is why I have a spacer between my left cleat: my leg is a bit shorter, so I was trying to “overreach”, pulling me more towards the left side of the saddle. This led to a small knee injury on the right side, because my knee was “popping”, as it had to stretch to far to meet lefts end.

I’ve replaced the bibs I used already for 2 new pairs which I knew was good quality rather than using an old pair for training, found out the pad in the old ones was too narrow and my usual bibs are a lot wider. I’ve just lowered the saddle 3mm to see if this changes anything after my session tonight.

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have you checked your sit bone width? i was on the 155mm power saddle for many years before actually going on the retul saddle width recommendation device at a spesh dealer. turns out I was supposed to use a 143 mm. if you haven’t had your sit bone width checked might be worth getting it measured. just eliminates one variable of why you’re getting sores.

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I did measure them when I was purchasing the power and it came out at 150mm so that’s what I got the 155mm

After around 75,000 miles, at a guess, having never had a saddle sore before (including a lot of big days in the saddle) subsequent to a bike fit I started to get saddle sores. The fit lowered my saddle and I attributed it to a shift of my weight through my butt. I also wore out shorts and pedals on one side the fit did address a leg length discrepancy so I don’t think now it was the fit. I have had another issue which culminated last year and it may have been that causing the sores and excess wear on the right side.

that’s good. Looks like it might be time to see the bike fitter then. a lot of saddle problems are not actually caused by your saddle but how your body interacts with the bike. could be too long, too short and etc. best to get a professional to have a look. I booked a session with the bike fitter since I had saddle sores too. didn’t change anything yet I was getting it. your body changes after a while.

hope it helps.

I had exactly the same sore issue but with an ISM saddle. It turned out to be a leg length difference and went away straight away with a 2mm shim under the cleat.

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Also lowered my saddle 3mm before I bought a new one (going from Pro Stealth to Power Arc). Unfortunately, for me, it was really the shape of the saddle and for me a lack of padding.

The Pro Stealth has a rough edge exactly where my pressure spot was. So, effectively, I was literally sitting on the edge of my saddle on the left side, leading to chafering and pressure.

Also, the Pro Stealth for me is completely flat, whereas the Power Arc has some padding at the back, effectively lifting your whole bottom a bit from the saddle, reducing pressure towards the front.

For me, that helps. But lowering my saddle 3mm was not enough (even tried 5mm).

I recently learned from another bike fitter that the position and density of your joints can change over years, as you put pressure on muscles and tendons, meaning that the fit that was good this year may need to be revised (slightly) next year.

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saddle sore on one side is generally seat too high related. Try lowering 5mm and report back.

Note: I was getting this really bad, my seat ended up coming down almost 20mm to get fit to where it needed to be. So the 5mm may not be enough initially, but its always easier to start lower and work your way up than the other way around.

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Though I agree generally, my saddle was put UPWARDS (somewhere between 5mm-1cm), and my saddle sore is gone.

Just wanna add that seat too high may be the issue, but may be not the only cause.

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absolutely, which was why i said generally.
Anything bike fit related is very personal, so without seeing an individual its hard to provide definitive comments - nor am i experienced enough frankly to do it.
for MOST people though, the general statements in this thread should provide them the direction to hunt in if they want to self assess. If its not working, then you need to get someone who can be hands on and knows what they are doing to assist.

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