The Endurance Diet

Has anyone followed read the book ‘The Endurance Diet’ by Matt Fitzgerald? If so, did you see improvements in performance, loose weight or both? Did you track your Diet Quality Score though the app? What suggestions would you have for anyone trying to follow this diet? My goals are mainly weight loss (tried everything, nothing works anymore), but performance is good too. Many thanks.

EDIT:

I meant to also ask, Matt was on the podcast talking about his book “How Bad do you want it?” (Bad is the answer), and I’ve looked but I can’t see a podcast with him about The Endurance Diet, even though it seems to be a popular topic. Has there been one that I’ve missed, or is it an option for a future special @Jonathan ? Thanks again.

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If you search this forum you will see there are at least 3 topics on exactly this subject. Might be useful reading

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Oh gosh you are right. Silly me.

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Here is a quick link to search results:

https://www.trainerroad.com/forumsearch?q=The%20Endurance%20Diet

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There are some topics that are based on the book but all are specific in nature. I have a question and it seems to me that it would not make sense to add them to the existing threads?

Any reason this thread cannot be a general discussion thread? I don’t know the protocol so here is my question and won’t be offended if this deleted.

My question is;
Anything that has less that 100% whole wheat is to be counted as a refined grain food. It’s basically impossible to find 100% whole wheat bread/wraps (flat bread) so why even bother with it and just eat 100% refined since the points are the same and enjoyment is up. Obviously that doesn’t make sense but the scoring system does seem to dis-incentivize in this regard. I can buy a wrap that only has a small amount of refined flour so why be penalized when it is nearly all whole wheat flour and whole grain?

If you know it’s 50% whole and 50% refined, then give yourself half a point in each?

Most of the time they don’t break it down for you, so it could be 90% refined and 10% whole.

I like the way the points are, it encourages you to adopt the healthier eating habits. As somebody who only ate refined all his life, it was a boon.

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That’s right, you don’t know the ratios. In Aus at least they labeling requirements state the ingredients must be listed in descending order so you have some idea. I suppose you could have a tick for both refined and unrefined. The point is to move to unrefined, but just seems harsh to lose all credit just because there is some portion of refined. Same goes for “sweets”. Any added sugar = sweet and zero credit for whatever goodness is in there too.

Yes, I went from 198 to 181 pounds following this when I prepped to do the Mt St Helens ride. His book is legit

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I just started reading it after coming across so many recommendations like yours. I believe @Nate_Pearson has read it a few times. I read the intro and a few chapters and apparently I’m a skeptical person. I swear it feels like he’s giving me a sales pitch and going to attempt to sell me something. I’m kidding (kinda) and looking forward to it.

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@cub8556 I’m back to my 197-ish pound body right now. As a former heavy lifter, I have a lot of muscle mass. It took a lot to get down to that 181. When I race for the gold medal up St Helens next year, my goal weight is 175. To put it in perspective, I’ll never race up that mountain if I’m over 189 pounds…no way! That was hard enough at that weight EDIT: that book is awesome. That low weight is not sustainable for me year-round. My fat ass likes to eat too much :smiley: that, and in the “off season”, when I pick up a barbell, my weight always jumps up. I do a crap ton of push-ups and pull-ups

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I absolutely second that. The score is no goal to achieve in itself but a guide to develop healthier eating habits.

Let’s not forget that the book also gives some guides on how much to eat, when to eat, etc. It’s solid advice overall.

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Where do you live? In the US grocery stores (even Walmart) have 100% whole wheat choices.

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I’m a fan of the book, but I agree the first few chapters feel a bit pitchy and self-promotional. If you can get through those, the rest of the book is very solid.

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Right now I’m about half way through the book for a second time. For the past several years I’ve eaten fairly well, but I’ve made a few changes based on the endurance diet and seen my body composition change for the better. I am now eating largely whole foods and fresh veggies. Tonight I’m going to a cookout at my in-laws and I’ll eat whatever I want in reasonable amounts and not feel bad about it. Tomorrow I’ll be back to my normal “diet” and life will go on.
As I began to base my diet more around the endurance diet I found I needed to increase my protein intake in order to not be hungry as often. YMMV.

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It’s good to hear that. I quit about half way through because of this, and the repetitive athlete stories telling the same “I eat just like the book recommends” story over and over. I’ll have to go back and read the 2nd half.

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Regional Queensland, Australia. I have found today a wrap that is 100% whole wheat but it’s paper thin. It’ll do though.

Yeah skip the anecdotes. They do get repetitive, just assume that he has examples of pros experience if what he’s about to talk about!

I’m actually eating less since I have realised I snack out of habit and boredom not from true hunger. Brain says “hey you’re hungry” but when i think about it I don’t have that pot of the stomach hunger so I don’t eat. It’s an eye opener really. Not being afraid of Carbs is a nice change too. Eating more (but healthier) carbs and I’m loosing weight at a good slow pace so far.

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