N+1 gone... help. 😮

A little light hearted, there are bigger problems in the the world…

With a 2016 frame on handbuilt 50’s and 105 with rim brakes and in very condition and a bike that I like, i decided this would be the year I’d treat myself to a new more aero, ‘lectric geared, replacement bike.

I’ve done alot of searching and read a lot of reviews about Bianchi’s and Cervelo etc, and finally found a 2020 AXS TCR Pro 0 Disc on offer available now in black for $5000. It could be mine next week.

Thing is, I can’t bring myself to buy it. Because of the worlds issues I know this might be the last chance I get to buy such a machine at this price, but I’ve become emotionally detached and fixated on saving the cash instead.

What’s wrong with me? :blush:

Not buying a bike isn’t going to solve the world’s problems.

If you wait then prices will certainly go up a lot.

If you can afford it and it’s not a choice of a new bike or shoes for the kids then i’d say “go for it”.

(I bought myself a new Tacx Neo 2 trainer this week - And it made me very happy.)

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Serious q: what else would you do with the cash? Is there a wider plan here?

If you’re saving for something meaningful, or feel you need to establish a savings pot, then absolutely do that; financial security obviously comes first. I also think there may just be bikes around for a while yet :grinning:

But if your finances are steady, I doubt a similar bike will be less expensive in the future. Being emotionally detached from a purchase is no bad thing, but do remember you only live once.

Well, essentially it’d go into a very poorly paying savings account or a Vanguard (passive investment) account for our retirement find which’d top up our pension savings.

I’m balancing that, N+1 (because lets face it I can ride my current bike as fast as my club colleagues and don’t race road bikes) and the fact “only live one” attitude the latter on the basis a close friend of mine died from Covid recently, you never know when your time is up.

Its nice to have new things, discs, AXS etc, although I don’t needed it… :smiley:

I suppose the question is would $5k make a big difference to the retirement fund? I’m absolutely not asking for personal info, just sort of trying to say that if there’s several hundred k in said fund, 5k is a arguably a bit irrelevant; if there’s 15k, it’s a different argument…

Totally a personal thing. If you don’t need the money (i.e. you’d be perfectly secure financially without it), then I would use it on something to make me or my family happy. But I wouldn’t spend money that would leave me worrying about it afterwards. Hope that makes sense.

Honestly felt the same for a while, I have all the bikes I want/need, and the draw of something new is low. I’d say if you don’t actually feel like upgrading your current bike, just don’t - new isn’t always better. But if that new bike is your dream bike and you’re just hesistant to part with the cash, just go for it. I’ve found that when you live on very little money for a while, but then get a new better job etc, it actually takes a bit to allow yourself to spend again. Maybe you’ve just got into the habit of saving, but you don’t actually need to?

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If you don’t want it, don’t get it. Your current bike is great so there’s clearly no need for it. Listen to your head, absolutely no reason to do something that will make you feel guilty or that you won’t be psyched about. There will always be bikes to buy if the motivation to purchase comes back again.

I’m so sorry to hear about your friend.

@jwellford Thanks.

@RecoveryRide I won’t bore you with the long story - I used to be very materialistic, decided to change and in the 4 years I was changing work got pretty lucrative - we’ve saved a big chunk TBH, in that the £5k wouldn’t be an impact to our goals. However, now I’m the other way, can’t bear to part with it, a. bit like @splash says, and I should have never read Mr Money Mustache :smiley:

All good points then, I think I should save the cash and enjoy my current bike, the way things are going I might need $5k for a new cassette I the future!

I really like his philosophy - in moderation. If you adhere to it too closely, you end up doing nothing to “treat yourself” in life, and you end up in a downward spiral towards being a miser a la Silas Marner (a little bit of dramatic exaggeration there :rofl:).

There’s a balance to be had - save enough so your family is financially secure, so that you can “retire” a few years early, but that you enjoy yourself along the way.

I don’t spend with much frequency on life “luxuries”, but when I do, I make it count. To me, a bike falls in the “make it count” category.

Sorry to hear about your friend. I had 2 friends die from cancer last year. Puts things in perspective that we don’t have much time on this planet.

So I’ll be the devil on your shoulder - if you really want the bike, and can afford it, go for it.

+1. I went through the same mental process a couple of years ago, and ended up buying the bike (as a birthday present to myself to help justify it) and don’t regret it for a minute. Fast forward a year and circumstances pushed me into early retirement - fortunately the spend on the bike didn’t have huge impact, but given the change in my income there’s absolutely no way I’d buy it now.

So I’m glad I bought it whilst I could. It makes me happy. Even walking past it makes me smile, let alone riding it.

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Bingo

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We buy bikes because we like them and want to ride them. It is an emotional process. We rarely buy bikes just because we can.

When advising people which bike to buy, my default is almost always “ the one you like more”. People that opt for their second choice usually aren’t satisfied after a while and wish they had followed their gut.

In this case, I’d give the same advice, but on the other side of the coin. Your heart isn’t in the purchase, so why make it? My guess is you’ll come to regret making the purchase.

And n+1 is a lifetime rule / process…it will always hold true at some point, but that point doesn’t always need to be this particular moment in time. :sunglasses:

I’m gonna look at this a different way than a few of you. I bought my sl6 pro in May of 2019 when I probably SHOULDN’T have financially. However I felt I needed a new bike and would not have been happy with anything less at the time. I knew in my head it was a purchase that I did not NEED to make but I did it anyway because it was what I truly wanted in a bike, it checked every box for a new bike purchase. I kept going back and forth on what brand and model to get for 2 years before that. I had always wanted a Tarmac and when they first offered a build with Sram force axs I swooned and knew it was the one. I absolutely love this bike and genuinely smile every time I see it. In hindsight it’s made me so happy over the last two years. So back to finances, I should not have bought this bike when I did however, it forced me to get serious about my finances afterward and sent me on a savings and debt reduction spree. Fast forward to today and I have just bought my first home and will be debt free aside from that home next month. Here’s the best part, I have no interest in upgrading to a new bike because I love mine so much. I believe that a new bike purchase should elicit an emotional response otherwise what’s the point.

In summary from your post it sounds like you really want a new bike but aren’t sold on this one. If you don’t feel like you can’t carry on without this bike then why spend the money. Hold the $ as your bike fund and Wait until something comes along that you have an emotional response to and you may be happier in the long run. Just my two cents from a guy who couldn’t afford his bike when he got it :sunglasses: :call_me_hand:t3:

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Every few years after I buy my Forever Bike, someone puts out another Forever Bike. What’s wrong with me?

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Some very good points. I can’t buy the bike off a complete logical checklist of parts, and as above I really want the feeling of being able to impatiently anticipated “next weekends ride” becuase of that emotional investment.

Back to gazing at the Bianchi Oltre XR3 even if I couldn’t afford the Di2…