How to stop being scared of sugar?

Not to mention caries…

but seriously our body needs top consume exactly 0 carbs to perform, so why eat something which causes so much harm…

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As far as I know consuming sugar immediately before and during exercise isn’t that bad for you. It’s when you eat sugar all the time and you don’t exercise that can create problems. Plenty of other great advice here.

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What’s this?

I’d like to see where you got this info and what you mean by ‘perform’.

What harm is it causing to consume carbs/sugars during exercise?

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Carbs? The most appropriate food for humans? Just look at many millions of healthy Chinese people living on 85% of carbs a day.
And especially for athletes (cycling) it’s even more necessary to consume carbs/sugars.

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I’m scared by how little I’m scared of sugar.

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Tooth decay - it’s the French word for it.

I never said there is anything wrong with carbs. I said there’s a problem consuming sugar and sitting on your butt. If you consume sugar before and during exercise that is the best “window” for your body to process them. if you want to go that route it all depends where you people live and the conditions they live in. How did the eskimos survive living in artic conditions? Not too many carbs there.

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Did I miss a landmark study that shows sugar causes cancer? Nor correlation, but causality?

The idea that we can perform just fine without carbs is simply wrong. We can exercise at a certain level without carbs, but some levels of intensity are simply not possible on a sustained basis w/o carbs.

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Your lifetime risk of cancer of any variety is currently close to 50% if you live in North America or Europe. Probably lower because I assume if you’re posting on TR you are more active than the average person and don’t smoke, but it’s still going to be north of 20-30%.

If you eat sugar, your lifetime risk of getting cancer will be…

the same. Because while in vitro studies suggested that sugar helps cancer grow, actual human studies showed that dietary intake of sugar did absolutely nothing to cause or promote cancer.

Eat all the sugar you need/want, just don’t get fat, because being overweight is associated with an increased risk of cancer.

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Caries is tooth decay/cavities caused by bacteria feeding on sugar.

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I have the same fear and have switched to UCAN with good results. I do not work for them nor is this an advertisement. In the end it is a starch that releases steady carbs to the bloodstream. I think there are many on this forum who agree with @dmalanda and this person more vibes with me. Be sure to think about your intensity regarding high sugar loading. If it’s a 2 hour ride at zone 2, take something that is slower steady release as you will not need that super punch from Maurten etc…If you are going all out in a race then yes calculating both calories and carbs prior is a good idea to stay fueled. Even the TR podcast has started to say the word intensity when they speak of carbs per hour. That was not the case earlier and many just blindly sucked down sugar but did not think about intensity or length.

Off bike nutrition is also key. I make a fantastic Neapolitan pizza, but limit it to once every two weeks. Mostly lean meat and veggies. My son is a Men’s Physique competitor, I cannot eat like he does (17yo compared to 51yo dad). So much food of all kinds mostly lean proteins. But I can eat recovery food like he does after a lengthy 2+ hour ride with carbs of course. Food not always product, except for whey in my smoothie.

Each body is in individual. Go with what works by experimenting. Sometimes I just need a tsp of honey to get through 30/30 Vo2 or threshold and hold the watts for the 90 minute wo. That depends on what was put in the tank two hours before. It’s a total calorie/carb intake in the equation Amber mentioned many moons ago. I love my oatmeal with natural peanut butter or oatmeal with pecans and a small amount of maple for longer rides. Costco sells Morning Sunrise Cereal. I LOVE the taste but can burn through that like a mad hummingbird.

Be healthy first and ride fast second. It will be more enjoyable even if you race gravel…(how I miss real road races locally) hahahaha.

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No.

Just, no.

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A good summary of the current state of research concerning keto diet and cancer

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The Nobel prize committee would like to have a word with you

Your teeth rot but the stuff that literally makes our teeth rot properly isn’t bad for the rest of our body…

1 in 4 Americans get cancer, not 50%.

Sidenote: there have been studies which show that cancer isn’t actually hereditary, it’s familial.

Eg Chinese kids adopted by American parents have the same rate of cancer as Americans and vice versa. It is not your genes which seal your fate as much as who raises you

Another sidenote: a recent study which spans multiple generations shows that higher consumption of fat (including saturated fat) lowers the risk of heart disease. Fat on your heart and in your arteries is bad but it was a false assumption that fat in your diet leads to those dangerous conditions

Back to the topic: ppl have a weird attitude toward self care bc healthcare is so expensive. Before any change in exercise or diet, go get a full panel of tests (kidney function, cholesterol, blood sugar, etc). Make a change and then test again 3 months later.

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I have asked a similar question to the trainerroad’s ask a cycling coach podcast and they did not answer that question. Here is the question that I asked:

My second question is regarding the gut microbiome. The good bacteria, which comes from 90% figure should make up the majority of the composition of our microbiome for us to be in good overall health (including a healthy heart and a healthy mind). At trainerroad, you promote the fuelling of workouts with quick fuel (aka processed foods). Amber even said, “do not diet on the bike”. I usually consume 1 or 2 cliff bars right before a workout at times, and I wonder what is the effect on the gut microbiome on consuming such energy bars over the long term? Assuming that I eat healthy 90% of the time off my bike, is consuming energy bars during workouts acceptable from a long-term health perspective?

I am confident that I now have the answer. I read a book called fast food genocide by Dr. Fuhrman and I was really shocked at what I was putting into my body on a regular basis. The cliff and the other energy bars you find at bikeshops and grocery stores often have added sugar, extracted protein isolates (another thing that is responsible for cancer growth), and other carcenogenic compounds. While I am not an expert in nutrition, I am going to paraphrase what I learned after reading Dr. Fuhrman’s books:

When you extract sugar from any particular compound such as sugarcane and then added into white flour or oat flour or whatever flour, it causes a dopamine stimulation in the brain as the sugar quickly enters into your bloodstream and can even penetrate the blood brain barrier at a relatively quick speed when there is nothing to slow down the speed of the entry. Added sugar also causes angeogenesis, a process by which fat cells grow and they form new blood vessels to fuel the growth of tumours.

The good news is that when you consume foods that naturally contain sugar and are unprocessed such as berries and dates, the glycemic load is much lower relative to eating added sugar. I personally fuel my rides with dates as it has a lot of fiber and phytochemicals which reduce the glycemic effect and does not have the negative effects as added sugar does.

TLDR: Dates and other natural sweeteners do not cause a problem with blood pressure, health or weight so stick with those.

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Getting off topic, but the lifetime incidence of cancer is unfortunately much higher than 25% in the US. It was measured at 40% in the US in 2015-17, but is felt to be closer to 50%, in-line with other western countries like Canada and the UK.

The incidence gap between the US and other western countries is felt to be due to poorer availability of primary healthcare in the US, so a significant number of cancers are just never diagnosed in the US compared to other countries. :cry:

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You’re right. My bad. I’ve had that number in my head for a while but now I’m unsure why.

You can have my cake after you pry it from my cold, dead hands.

Probably after I was hit by a car. Which is something I legitimately fear, but I still ride a bike 2 hours a day for work. So, I guess fear isn’t a big issue for me in general.

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