Exercise-induced Eustachian Tube Dysfunction

Every once in a while when doing a max 15-30 second sprint towards the end of an hour of power ride I get this in my right ear. It feels and sounds like when your ear is filled with water. Never had it happen in a race which is strange. I googled and from what I can gather may be caused by holding your breath when straining. A small air bubble is the culprit.

Anyone else? Insight? It usually resolves itself with in an hour after the sprint.

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only when I jump into the pool after finishing a workout or outdoor ride :wink:

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I get this, didn’t realise it had a name.

I’ve got to be trying very very hard for it to happen, my right ear goes first, then the left shortly after.

I get it during racing, especially towards the end when i’m starting to kick on the run, but, i’m not holding my breath, quite the opposite, i’ll be moving LOTS of air at that point, which I guess could give the same result.

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I get this all the time in my right ear…like not even when I’m working out. I’ve tried some meds through my doctor none of which helped. I informally consulted an ENT colleague of mine (I’m a physician myself) and he said it’s only a problem if it annoys you.

It’s due to the valve like function at the end of the tube not working properly and the fluid not draining out of the ear effectively. Which is why it sounds like…wait for it…water in the ear :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

Why it would only happen during exercise is beyond me…

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I consulted an ENT about this. It’s due to dehydration.

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Thx @IronJohn. Interesting…

That makes sense. If you are dehydrated your ‘ear secretions’ are probably just a bit thicker due to lack of water. Perhaps just enough to make them not drain properly. I’ve never noticed if I’m worse when dehydrated it’s worse when I have a head cold, though. I’ll have to pay attention after my next workout

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It took me a while to make the association, but typically after a race is when this would occur. It happened at USAT Nationals in Milwaukee, and while waiting to get my bike out of transition mentioned it to a guy next to me. Turned out he was an ENT doc and he explained why this develops.

Lots of fluids always cures it.

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