Best way to add some volume?

Hi,
Currently doing ssblv2, but when I have some extra time, i’d like to add some TSS since I do feel fresh and recovered in between sessions (doing LV because of time constraints, not recovery/fitness)

If I have a one hour workout planned, but I wanted to train for, say, 90 minutes, would it be better to:
a) do the prescribed one hour workout, and add 30 minutes of endurance at the end
b) do the “+” version of the same workout which is 90 minutes (where available)

I personally would prefer option two, but I’m a bit worried as often the intensity factor is also diffirent… Or is this purely because of the altered duration and are targeted adaptations the same?

Enlighten me with your knowledge/experience :grinning:

Both are excellent options. If option 2 allows you to recover I would go with that. Vice versa for option 1.

However, if you want to play the safe game, go with option 1 and see how it goes. If all works out, upgrade to option 2.

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Both options are ok. You can mix them depending on your recovery. Option 2 is better in terms of progression of workouts - more intervals, more TiZ. I would add more TiZ for everything below FTP and add Z2 for anything above.

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I’ve had a lot of success recently by not doing stepped warmups before interval workouts but instead just riding easy and gradually raising my power for 30 minutes to warm up.

I find I’m just as prepared physically for the first interval, but I personally find it less mentally taxing than the ~10-minute stepped warmups. Combine with a 10-minute extended cool down and it’s a great way to fit in an extra 30 minutes without changing the main interval structure.

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I have the same observation with the same protocol. It does not improve fitness but makes the workouts feel a lot better make metabolism work properly before efforts.

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I have just completed SSBMV2 and I went with option a) for the majority of my 60 mins workouts. I found it a good and sustainable way to add some TSS.

The only different being with the Tuesday v02 workouts I started to add a 15min progressive warmup and then only 15 mins z2 at the end as I found the standard warmup for these workouts too short.

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I’m almost reluctant to post this, but didn’t a certain Mr Armstrong say that adding steady state work after his intervals was one of his key training methods? I’m sure I recall reading that somewhere.

My own strategy would be to add Z2 work afterwards. You’re not increasing ANS stress with further high z3/z4 work, but you’re adding volume. The intervals should be giving you the vast majority of the higher end work you’ll need.

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Another vote for add z2 afterwards. At mid volume, a lot of the VO2 max work out extra time is that anyway in my experience.

With option b, it’s also not black and white on more or less intensity with plus or minus versions. It depends - some have the same intervals with longer or shorter recoveries. Certainly I’ve found it’s worth looking up the day before at the options.

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I just do Low Volume plans and add a ton of Z2 after the planned session. It seems the safest way to add volume without killing your body.

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Thanks for all the answers!

I’ve decided to play it safe and go with option one. Better to be safe than sorry. :+1:

The general advice of Coach Chad et al on the podcast is the best way to add volume is to add 15-30 minutes of endurance at the end of the prescribed workout. This increases volume without significantly increasing training stress or compromising recovery.

However, if you have down selected to the LV plan for time rather than recovery reasons, you may well be able to handle the 90 minute versions.

But I would advise a progressive approach to increasing volume. Try adding some endurance, if you recover from that, try some of the 75 minute versions of the plan workouts and if you can recover well from those, then try the 90 minute versions.

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Why would it not improve fitness?

Ok, my bad. It will make something for the fitness, as this is simply some volume. It is not game changing improvement.

But now, if I had a choose between adding time to my warmup or Z2 after the workout I would definitely prefer adding longer warmup. Especially with better fitness I see that I need longer time to start the engine working fully.

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This!

N=1, but I’m on LV due to time constraints. Nail the planned workout and, if I had time on the day, add in the extra Z2. As I was able to handle that (and time allowed), I would try to bump to the + version. Over serval weeks of doing that and recovering well, I’ve been able to add good TSS with a lot of flexibility of time.

Play the cautious game and see how you handle small TSS bumps before you go too hard and burn out.

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In last autumn I started a customized plan for Christmas. Some workouts has 15-25 minutes or so at 65% at the end. Like Baird +6.
And after some years following several plans, I felt was good for my fitness.
And now I have started Medium SSBase 2. And I don’t see this kind of workouts with 15-25 minutes 65% at the end.
Should I add it to my 1 hour workouts?

Very recent thread with a similar theme here: Best way to add some volume?

General consensus is yes - a good way to increase volume and base fitness without causing too much additional stress and therefore recovery is to extend the cooldown in z2 (eg. 65% FTP). This is certainly what I did on most of my 1hr workouts in the SSBMV2 plan I completed recently.

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