Anyone Ridden a Yoeleo

you can get an emoda for 5k with force etap

the r11 di2 is 6k

I have to say the “YOLO” bike looks better and seems to have nice wheels from factory…
But like you said… not sure which one is better

but lets face it…
there is no longer budget friendly race bikes…
all bike brands seem to be trending to infinity and beyond price territory.

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I personally wouldn’t buy a full bike from China. With groupsets constrained they probably aren’t getting good prices on those parts.

Trek Emonda ALR ($1100) is a budget racing frame. Put on 105 mechanical on it and get a set of budget carbon wheels for $600 if you need that speed. Or buy it complete for $2200:

Or, any previous generation used 11 speed racing bike is plenty to race with.

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I think the spread in prices is just getting wider. The middle rank of racing bikes are pretty darn good. I think us old timers that used to buying a nice frame for $1200, a top tier groupset for $1000, and then adding in some wheels are just sticker shocked by $10K, $15K+ top tier bikes.

I’ve got my eye on that Emonda SL7 with 12 speed Di2 for $6,000. It seems like a lot of bike for the money. The SL5 for practically half the price though is mostly just as good for most people.

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I’m not sure a full bike is worth it - money saved on the frame is added to the components because they don’t have the same buying power as the big brands.

Looks to be a good frame-only option though.

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Lots of good points - I really appreciate it.

I was first drawn to Yeoleo based on the cost of just a frame. While I’ve never built a bike before, I can probably do it with enough YouTube videos and some more tools. I did notice yesterday that the prices of their complete bikes are comparable to several brands as mentioned, but also BMC (there’s a BMC shop within walking distance from work).

I had heard of Empire before but completely forgot about them. Fezzari’s prices seem very competitive, especially $2900USD for the Empire Elite (Ultegra mechanical) and Empire Elite Rival AXS ($3300USD). The next bike up has 40mm carbon wheels but is another $1000USD.

Anyway, more the look at. Thanks for the recommendation, and please keep the comments coming!

The frame seems to be good price…
I wouldn’t mind getting one and transferring the old 10 speed ultegra to it…

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This is an instructive video:

A few issues during his build are worth noting:

He seems to have drilled out the cable stop and installed cable casing all the way to the front derailleur. Apparently, some Shimano front derailleurs have cable stops on them? I had never heard of that. It almost sounds like he made a mistake or he improvised because he had that type of front derailleur?

On this R12 build, the guy had to grind down the thru-axel nut a little:

It’s probably good to consider that you might have these little challenges on an inexpensive frame not made by a major manufacturer.

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@Joelrivera , that was my thinking exactly. However, based on the R11 video, I’ll need direct mount brakes and a front derailleur at a minimum. I’d also like new shifters (although technically not required). Maybe I can convince the boss … er, wife … to get something like a Fezzari Empire, then get the R11 frame and slowly build up an N+1. :thinking:

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Is there any concern that the R11 frame does not use metal cups in the bottom bracket hole? The press fit bottom bracket presses flush against the carbon.

So, I just finished building an R12. Overall pretty pleased. I’ll list the good and bad.

Bad/meh:

  • Took F O R E V E R to arrive. I did get custom paint, so that might be expected. Ordered early November, delivered February.
  • Paint was a little heavier than they let on. Frame and fork ended up being about 250g more than I anticipated.
  • I had an H10 bar I purchased from them before and was told this would fit no problem. Wasn’t really the case. The holes lined up for routing fine, but there is a decent gap in the top headset cover and the top of the frame. Not a huge problem, but it bothers my eye to know its there.
  • Might be the harshest frame I’ve ridden.

Good:

  • Frame quality is definitely there. The bb appears to be machined along with the brake mounts. Not an industry standard practice.
  • Wire and hose routing was easy.
  • Paint quality is very good.
  • Stiff as all hell, but can be considered harsh. Cornering is point and shoot because of this.
  • Cheap. I’m tired of expensive bikes and I race too much to ride something insanely nice.

Nah it’s fine. This is pretty standard.

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Great insights, thanks! I’m most interested in the “harshest frame” comment as I don’t race and tend to do fondos and centuries. I also have a set of deep dish rim brake wheels so I’m leaning toward the R11 frame. Again, thanks!! BTW, do you have any pics of your build?

If you are just doing fondos, I’d go with the r11 and get a good seatpost.

It isn’t unbearable, but it doesn’t soak up the bigger hits all that well. I’m of the opinion that most of bike comfort is tires and fit so don’t read into that too much. Both of those frames fit at least a 32 tire so you can achieve the comfort that way too.

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Random thoughts.

Fondos and comfort? If this is about ride quality, price, rim brakes, and getting a good warranty why not consider the Trek AL2 for $1030:

and toss your deep dish rim brake wheels on it. Upgrade components at will. Yeah its aluminum but nothing wrong with that. The 56cm frame is spec’d at 21 lbs.

If you don’t care about warranty, also worth taking a look at

Yes overall I’m kinda confused by what exactly the remit is here from OP based on this and past threads I can recall.

Really want a specialized (or two), but don’t want to pay (understandable).

Not interested in used, aluminum, or brands other than Specialized and random brands like LB/Yoleo.

Etc…

FWIW, resale on these off brand frames will be particularly bad IMO.

Why not wait a bit and try to get a base Crux as a do it all bike?

TPC includes a 30 day satisfaction guarantee and atleast some non-as-described warranty though right?

(Their published pricing on website seems mostly insane IMO, but that’s a different topic.)

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I think so, but my only experience is selling a bike to TPC.

Pricing on TPC - yeah its like buying a used car from CarMax. Businesses need to make money. I’d rather buy a used car from a private party and save $$$.

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For clarity, I’m open to any brand bike, new or used, although I do have a preference for new. Cost is the main driver but I am willing to pay a little more for quality. I do want carbon fiber. Resale is not a concern as I maintain and keep my stuff until it’s unrepairable (hence me still riding a 2010 Motobecane that is 1-2 sizes too big with a mix of ultegra, 105, and lower components).

As for the whole Specialized thing, their marketing has certainly lured me in, as well as the seemingly large number of owners on this forum. However, for their prices, I could probably get two bikes from another brand or no-name that would be more than adequate.

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Have you looked at full bike options in the $2500-3000 range? Perhaps a good combo with an alu gravel bike down the line if that interests you?

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I don’t understand the value here.
$5900 (ultegra di2 ) with decent hubs + shipping + duty

Vs a brand name/ known quantity

$5900 shipped (+ local tax) Aeroad CF SLX 8 Disc Di2 | CANYON US

$5000 mechanical, but exists ($5900 for the one comparable one)

$5700 2022 Foil RC 20 » Bob's Bicycles

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@jfranci3 you are correct that the full bike prices of Yoeleo are comparable to several brands, including the ones you listed. However, the frame only cost of $1300USD is much lower than most other frames. If I transferred all of the components from my existing bike to the new frame then this is a good deal.

The one exception is that the complete Yoeleo bikes usually come with decent full carbon, deep section wheels.