Throwing up during intense workouts

Hi there,

I’ve always had issues with feeling nauseous when pushing my body to it’s limits and if I don’t back off on the throttle I inevitably throw up. My max heart-rate is 191 and it exclusively happens around the 185 mark.
It’s not really that big of a deal since I rarely end up with that high of a heart-rate during TR workouts but the ‘Ramp test’, that’s a different story. To my understanding I’m supposed to pedal until my legs cannot pedal any longer, however, it’s always my stomach that throws in the towel first resulting in me abandoning the test.

Anyone else with similar issues who has found a solution? I’d like to finish my ramp test in style!

Thanks!

I don’t have this issue on ramp tests, but sprinting it can happen.

Make sure I’m hydrated and there is as little in the stomach as possible before race worked for me.

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I have a pretty sensitive stomach too, so I feel your pain! For me it’s hard efforts on the TT bike. I notice that if I eat too close to my workout that is most likely going to cause :nauseated_face:. I also have to be careful with taking large swigs of drink mix right before an interval as well. Not sure if you are drinking fluids during the ramp test or not, but if you are, maybe cut them out next time. It’s a short enough effort that you won’t need them, and might help with the stomach issues.

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I’ve thrown up in my mouth previously (nothing major) and that was when I had an underlying health issue (bowel/colon cancer). Now the latter is sorted I don’t have a problem. We are all different but I usually follow the guide of not having a meal 1-2h before an effort and sip fluid and eat a banana during it. Although I will sometimes have a banana or energybar/gel closer to the start.

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I need 3-4h minimum for a meal before a maximal effort like a crit, less for a road race as it’s not as intense. Being well hydrated has helped, I’ve cut down on coffee consumption generally, but use caffeine pre race. Also repeating the efforts has reduced the effects, so now at the end of the season I’m a bit safer than at the beginning.

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This could be an outside possibility, but worth considering. I have exercise-induced asthma and as my breathing gets more laboured, I often feel sick. It can be linked to coughing during exercise, but sometimes I just feel sick anyway. Using an inhaler before exercise and very regular breathing helps, but not always. Cycling is actually less of a problem for me than rowing where I’ve puked many times.

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