Rocker Plate Users: Did it help your saddle sores?

The indoor trainer has been hitting the sores hard and I’ve since developed knee pain on the outside of my left knee (only when on trainer). I’ve heard rockers can help alleviate these issues. If you use one has it helped?

It would be pretty inconvenient to have one (space issues) and the cost is prohibitive but if it resolves the issues it may have to be an investment I make.

Thanks in advance.

FYI in regards to saddle sores I’ve tried everything. Different saddles fits bibs treatments soaps you name it. I still get them outdoors but they’re infinitely worse when on the trainer.

Basic rocker plates can be super-cheap to make…I think mine cost less than $60 in materials and a few hours of labor.

Nothing super fancy, but just enough left / right rock to add some comfort.

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This sounds more complex than just a rocker plate need.

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Did you use plans to make one? I have a kickr core, making the plywood base isnt challenge but a sheet of plywood here has tripled in price. Add on the rest of the parts and it maybe closer to 2-300? Not sure what entry level plates cost?

Not really…I can’t remember where I got the design for the top and bottom plate, but it was two pieces of 3/4 plywood, a 2x4 down the middle (with rounded edges) and mini-bosu balls for suspension.

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That design is so 1992 yo!!!

Where is @mcneese.chad aka Mr Rocker ???

(kidding - looks great and am sure it works great too)

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I did a rocker plate for a while, I think it led to imbalances. What actually helped me with sit soreness was to slow down my cadence. 85 on recovery efforts, 95 on efforts. Wailing away at 105 all the time really wore me down and isn’t really how I ride outside either.

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Absolutely! I had a Kicker on a gym mat for 2 winter seasons and could barely get through 90mins without ass pain. Last winter season I got an “Inside Ride E-Flex” which has front and rear motion, and riding inside became something i looked forward to, without any pain. Definitely worth it for me.

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Sometimes, adding even modest motion can help for saddle comfort and related biomechanics.

Using some compressible foam or rubber mat is a quick hack that is usually better than pure rigid.

I suggest this for people just wanting to test the the waters at least. But many people find that is enough for them and the small and minimal nature works great for tight setups.

I have one of those stock Mats for trainers but it seems to compress to the point of not offering any give.

Something like this.

Yeah, those are fine in a pinch but not quite what I’m talking about. Using multiple layers of mats like that to get something like 1-3" thickness under each trainer foot. Then match height increase at the front for proper level or higher front to your preference.

You need enough thickness and a soft enough material that you get compression on one sure and a bit of expansion on the opposite.

Ive seen people hack up thos garden kneeling pads and stuff like it. Cheap and easy try for a quick test.

You mentioned size being an issue, so I’ll share the one I use, which isn’t full length. I have sit bone pain, not sores, but bad enough that I have to stand every 10 mins or so. My rockr made things BETTER, but it’s not perfect and it was not a cure all. I would buy it again, it’s just not miraculous. ROCKR POD LITE

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I used a quarter sheet of plywood from Lowes ($20) and 4 tennis balls ($6). Books for the front wheel height adjustment. It’s not perfect, but doable.

Give that a shot and keep the sticker on the plywood. If it doesn’t work, return it.

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What trainer do you have?

Kickr Core. With the parallel pipe legs

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I feel like I could make that. The website doesn’t show what’s underneath? As in what makes it give?

It has 3 simple curved ribs, and can add balance pods for more resistance. Similar to this design.

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I fail to see your point. :crazy_face:

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That looks to be about 1-1.5” off the ground? Is that enough? Also are the balance pods? Inflatable balls? If so do you have any recommendations? Or would you forego the curved ribs and just go for the balls?

Thanks.

I’m not at home or I would take a pic, but I think they’re this
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