Rest Intervals too long?

I find that some rest intervals are too long (i.e. Sanford), and I’m way recovered before the start of the next strenuous section. My rear end starts to hurt because of no pressure on the pedals. My butt bones do sit properly on my seat. Is there a way to advance forward through a rest interval, or is there a way to deal with it some other way?

You can just tap on the workout graph to advance the workout.

As above, you pause the workout and then tap / click on where you want to move to.

But wider point - there’s a reason why Sanford is like that. It’s in the first taper week of 40k TT Speciality (mid volume). So the whole idea is that you keep working at the high percentages of FTP, but the volume at that intensity drops, and the overall intensity factor goes down. Therefore - longer rest intervals. It’s not meant to be a vo2 sweatbucket session.

So if you’re doing the plan, then beware of making the session too hard when you should be tapering. And if you’re not doing that plan, then maybe pick another workout.

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Good to know, thanks

As @martinheadon says: you need to look at workouts in the context of where they are in the plan, and potentially where the plan sits in the whole: Base - Build - Speciality sequence. So some workouts are introductory efforts say for VO2max or over-unders, not hard in themselves but jumping straight in to the harder workouts would be too much. Progressive overload is the term.

Look at the plans, SSB Mid Volume One as an example - https://www.trainerroad.com/app/cycling/plans/147-sweet-spot-base-mid-volume-i Look at Saturday, the workouts are all over-under but the TSS and IF value slowly increase week by week. Doing McAdie+1 on week 1 would be a real slap in the face.

Now look at Sanford in the context of the 40k TT plan and you see a reduction in load as you approach your target event (which in normal times would be at the end of the final week of the plan). The workout is aiming to keep some of the intensity so that you don’t lose the higher end but reduce the overall load, i.e. tapering.

Ah…you have to pause it first? On some workouts I had been trying to move forward by tapping the screen (or using a cursor) and not advancing, but I wasn’t pausing it first. Thanks for the tip!

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Full info:

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