GP5000 clincher duralbility? Early flat for me

Like the title says - I have maybe 1000kms on my gp5000’s clinchers and found a cut right through the centre of the rear - small wish and probably would not have noticed it had it not been for my rear tube going flat (mystery solved even though it will hold air and not leak under water). Just curious to hear other’s experiences.
I know it can happen at any time to any brand of tire - but in the past few years of using Michelin power (endurance and competition) my luck has been better.

I’ve just purchased a pair of the 5000 TL. Been a huge fan of the 4000s and I’ve been pretty lucky with their durability. As this will be my first adventure with tubeless, I’m hoping for more of the same.

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I haven’t found the 5000s any less durable than the 4000s but to me they feel noticeably stickier. I like.

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I would agree they do feel great. Going to inspect my front tire to see how it looks once it is cleaned later and possibly order another. Like I said before I know it can happen anytime to any tire and I would hope they are fairly durable because I love the feel.

i bought a pair of 5000 gp’s recently and have had good luck. one pinch flat in the rear that was my fault hitting train tracks. and 1 gash in the front on a descent. whatever i hit actually exploded (not a noise ive ever heard from a tire blowing) and i smelled something burning. when i got to the bottom of the hill i found a small gash in the tire, and a white powder all over my bike. and i gave them a pass for flatting on something blowing up in my face.

Apart from that, no issues, around 1000 miles ridden on them.

I took the plunge on a set of GP5000 recently.

The only reason I bought them was because my current set of GP4000 were showing conflicting wear information. One of the wear marks on each tyre was gone, but the other was fine. I was worried and bought the GP5000, but it turned out (direct from Conti) that the uneven wear marks are fine and they are still good to use.

Anyway, I digress.

Back to the GP5000. I think third time out, my front tyre got trashed. Tear in the sidewall. Yes, it could have happened to any tyre, but it happened on my zvery new and not very cheap GP5000. The tyres felt good (while they lasted), but then again, so do a new set of GP4000.

After this incident I’ll be running the 4000s for a while longer… Tried, trusted and cheaper!

I’ve been running 4000’s for years. I’ve had some that I changed because they wore out and I’ve replaced some that were damaged while riding and could have happened at any time. I’ve just put 5000’s on my bike and I expect they will perform exactly the same way, or at least not noticeably different from a sidewall strength perspective. For what it’s worth, testing says the 5000 is marginally less robust compared to the 4000SII:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/road-bike-reviews/compare/continental-grand-prix-4000s-ii-2014-vs-continental-grand-prix-5000-2018

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The website @julianoliver used to compare the GP4s to 5s is a great one.

Below is a link from the same site comparing the Michelin Competition and Michelin Endurance that you were previously riding to the Conti GP5s. As you can see, the Michelins are more durable, but have greater rolling resistance.

The Michelin Competition vs. the Conti GP 5s gives you a good comparison of similar type tires. The Michelin Endurance is a difference class of tire and perhaps should be compared to GP 4 seasons or similar training tire.
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/road-bike-reviews/compare/continental-grand-prix-5000-2018-vs-michelin-power-competition-2016-vs-michelin-power-endurance-2016

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I’ve got about 1,500 miles on a pair of 5000TLs - so not quite the exact tire you’re asking about - and have had no issues. Love them in fact

Did have to go pickup a teammate this past weekend when he got forced into the gutter by a car and shredded the sidewall of his rear 5000TL. Hard to say it was the tire’s fault though - the hole he went into would’ve likely destroyed just about any tire

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I know this thread is a year old, but I’ve put 5000 miles on my 28mm tubeless and the rear is just at the point of needing replacement. Not a single puncture during that time. The “threading” along the bead line started to fray a while back and I’ve had to cut “loose threads” off from time to time like on a shirt thats unraveling.

I did make a note of this somewhere, but think I deleted it since. I got about 3,500 miles on the rear and about 4,500 on the front before first puncture IIRC.

Another time, I got a puncture on my first ride on them (about 65 miles in, and in October conditions), so that’s just bad luck. In general I think they wear well.

200km in on my first set of Gp5000s. :rofl:

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Switched to GP5000 after rebuilding my bike a couple of weeks ago (was running continental 4 seasons beforehand).

Things I’ve noticed:

  • cornering grip feels (subjectively I admit) a lot better
  • without doubt a smoother roll - more speed for less effort
  • they were a bas**rd to fit :laughing:

Only done about 200 miles so far - no problems to report

on the 8th ride (260 miles) my rear 5K TLs took a hit too big for a single Dynaplug and had to be patched (Hutchinson Rep 'Air kit) in October 2019.

Given the relative difficulty of repairing roadside, I gave the 4 Seasons a try and they went 2200 miles with only 1 minor flat. Then in late May rear 4Season suffered a sidewall tear and I retired them.

Really hard to tell with only 8 rides on the 5K TLs, but the older GP4Ks seemed a little more reliable. On those I usually got about 2500-3000 miles (bigger rider at 90+kg/200+lbs).

I’m running the 25c 5000 with latex for the first time this year. The only issue I’ve had is that I ran over glass with the back and cut the sidewall, left the tire on for a century like a dope, by mile 50 the tube made its way through the growing cut in my sidewall and blew out.

Replaced that rear tire with a used one from a buddy, did my first ride and came home and found a staple in the back tire which held fine until I pulled it out and it leaked air.

Replaced the tube and rode for a few weeks, came home last week and found another staple in my tire but when I pulled this out it didn’t leak.

Also had them on some nasty chunky gravel for about 1/2 a mile on Sunday, no issues. Honestly they’re no worse than my 4000 were for durability, and they grip super super good cause I love flying into corners.

Over 10,000kms on 5000 clinchers, running latex inner tubes.

Zero punctures, all seasons riding. Usual city conditions.

N=1 opinions are however almost totally worthless re punctures. As punctures are as much luck as they are science…

Bicycle rollingresistance.com is the only impartial testing of bike tires. There ratings are at least based on an actual uniform test, not a single riders opinion.

The 5000 is the fastest road tire with average puncture protection. You can get slightly faster, but every faster tire has terrible puncture protection.

The 5000 is still the best all round race/general tire, in my opinion.

If you need greater puncture protection go for something actually measurably superior.

Something like the GP4S.

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I’m around 4,000kms into a set of 25mm 5000 clinchers with latex tubes. They’ve been brilliant and have a ton of life in them. Prior to these I slashed a 5000TL front sidewall after a few 100km and the rear delaminated at ~4000km iirc.

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Three years ago I put some GP4000s on and took off the Gatorskins I was running (huge improvement). The very first ride on the 4000s I flattered the back tire. I questioned my decision but kept riding them along with latex tubes. Since then (~3 years -1 day) I haven’t had a flat and I average about 1200 to 1500 miles a year. Just was unlucky the first ride.

I’m now running GP5000s TL a new bike and so far this summer (fingers crossed) I’ve had no problems. Your luck may vary or YLMV

GP5000TL 25mm - 3000 miles and zero flats so far.

Flats are largely a matter of luck, not tire durability. If it will go through a GP5000 it will probably go through a Gatorskin. Sidewall cuts being one exception.