Why Pro Cyclist are getting stronger

Just thought I’d share, just interesting

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Nice link. Very well spoken.

Five hour loop with two one hour climbs. Nice.

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Nice interview. Interesting how the old school methods were more fun/enjoyable. Newer methods not much fun/enjoyment.

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Great video. Interesting to hear how training has evolved over the years; From loads of tempo to hours and hours riding at 150-250 watts, clearly z1 to low z2 assuming he has an FTP of 400 watts. Give that a thought. Clearly IF during the bulk of riding isn’t that important, as long as it is low enough not to induce to much fatigue to impair the hard workouts. Just get the hours in.

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I feel riding loads at 200-250w is done because that is still relatively easily fuelable (is that a word?). I feel that it should not be read as a low Z2 ride but as a carb-expinditure-capped ride.

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That’s a really good point

Great vid.
It was interesting how he framed his training as becoming “more polarised” like it was a new theory, when we are told polarised is just a description of how Pro endurance athletes typically trained.

I think it sums how the average Pro Cyclist is just very very gifted! As Dr Hutch describes in his book.

For years, the average keen amateur has already been streets ahead of them in terms of knowledge abut exercise physiology, training methods and nutrition, so when you then apply the “keen amateur” level of detail to a pro baseline engine- you get the insanity that is the modern peloton.

A bit like wide tyres, low pressures and aerodynamics- the peloton never rushed to adopt the “fastest” theories, because when you come off the sofa after off season still able to do 300w for 6hrs, you can mask a lot of sins :smiley:

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