Training to Cadence

Ok. Thanks for all the replies. I don’t think there was a clear consensus here on how to train. I think I will continue to try to do some work at 95 or above, and utilize those lower cadences when i’m struggling. Since lower cadences are already strong for me, I would benefit from training to those higher cadences where I am not as strong. Sound right?

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yes, I’m a believer in spin to win. Not necessarily a believer that everyone has a “natural” cadence. that may be true to some extent, but I think it’s used more as an excuse for people who haven’t really tried training to a higher cadence. So I would say, the higher the better. go for it.

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It does (sound right). There’s a lot of emphasis in the in-workout comments about using cadences that are useful in real riding, but also about expanding the range.

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Higher cadence the lower torque you have to provide to hit the same wattage, I vaguely remember studies around efficiency improving slightly at higher cadences too?

Studies I’ve seen are the opposite. Moderate cadences in the range of 80rpm are more efficient (lower oxygen demand) vs higher cadences.

These studies usually don’t however comment what cadence is best for fatigue resistance (general consensus that higher cadence is usually better here).

Usually, riders with skinny legs can be more efficient holding higher cadences. For riders with caveman legs (like me), there is a higher energy cost of spinning at a high cadence.

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That’s what I naturally do