Tacx Neo 2T - Bike lean to the right

I’ve had a Tacx Neo 2T for a few months now. It works flawlessly, but the only thing that puts me off is the fact that the bike leans to the right slightly when mounted on the trainer.

Does anybody else notice this? I’ve tried getting used to it, and it is certainly usable. I am a bit worried about how it may impact my pedal stroke.

The axle on the Neo 2T is asymmetric, with the drive side extending further from the centre of the unit than the other side - this off-centre design may mean that an amount of flex to the right is inherent in the design. But I am not sure if this is expected, or if my unit perhaps suffers more than most.

My bike has QR 130 dropouts and I am using the correct adaptor for this. I can use the QR 135 adaptor and this improves things a bit (positions the trainer more centrally between the dropouts). However, I am reluctant to use that because it is the wrong hub width for my frame.

I have a Neo 2T and the only occasion when I experienced something similar was when one of the dropouts wasn’t completely seated correctly because I put the bike on in a rush … so worth a double check? The bike absolutely should not lean to one side in normal use.

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Thanks for the reply.
I’ve worked with this trainer for 3 months now. I’m always careful to ensure the bike is mounted fully on the dropouts. I have even changed bike in that time, and it is consistently the same.

The lean is very subtle. Only just detectable by eye unless you examine it very carefully. More noticeable is the feeling while riding it, where my body weight (80kg) seems to cause it to flex slightly further to the right that it does the left.

The floor is perfectly level also. Using my old wheel-on trainer in the same spot, the bike is held very securely in a reassuringly bolt-upright position.

I had this same issue on and off last year - also with two different bikes. I tried changing the QR adapater sizing, would use levels and remount the bike repeatedly. In the end, I think it was the dropouts not being seated correctly on the drive side. However, I also thought that they were seated correctly when I experienced the issue. This indoor season, it’s been fine and has never come out of the proper position.

I was finding the same issue, but went away on its own.

My guess is the small flex that happens to the frame is being favored to one side when tightening the QR down. I find that the less I pay attention to how its seating in the dropouts the less issues I have. My procedure is to sit the bike down into the drop outs, lift the front end, and let gravity line up the back. Sit it back down and tighten it down.

Yeah I generally follow a similar procedure… Get everything set up and aligned with front wheel positioned in the riser. Then go back and re-open the quick release. Let it all settle without any tension, before clamping the QR.

Garmin have asked me for some photos, so I decided to set up a plumb-line string and take a proper look. Quite interesting actually. Made me realise that it sits pretty much vertical under its own weight. If I was being picky, the saddle deflects to the right by maybe 2 or 3 mm off centre. What I am experiencing as “lean” is actually flex when weighted. With me static on the bike, the saddle deflects to the right by over a centimetre.

I guess it doesn’t take much flex in the legs, body and hub of the trainer. You then have an off-centre mass causing flex in the bike frame also. It all adds up.

Will wait and see what Garmin say.

I have a gen 1 Neo and my bike leans to the right. It’s a common problem from what I hear. Here’s my solution: get two quarters and place them under the right side feet of the Neo. Does it still lean? If so, get two more quarters.

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Yup, shimming is the simple solution. The issue is the asymmetry in loading relative to the symmetric frame and non-adjustable designed flex.