Recovery with recovery boots

Hey there,
thinking about using recovery boots (something like: reboots.de). Is there somebody having experience with things like this? I had the chance to test those and I was amazed by how good it felt.

greetings,
Chris

The data I’ve seen says that compression during an activity hasn’t been confirmed to have effects, but that there’s positive data that supports decreased DOMS / reduced duration when using compression after activity. I have 2xu tights I always wear after races and big efforts, and after IMChatt, I did a few cycles in a friend’s boots. I definitely felt better afterwards, anecdotally.

For day to day training, I don’t think the boots will make you faster, but they might let you train harder, and that has real value.

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i have Elevated Legs and absolutely love them! A little less expensive than the big names out there, but just as good if not better IMO; and there’s a hot cold feature.

Elevated legs discount code: Use code BHSqueeze for 10% off your order.

Cheers
Brendan

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Got the Air Relax boots over the holidays. My wife and I think they do reduce how tired our legs feel the day after a long effort. Regardless, they feel soooo good when they are on.

This is what it comes down to for me…I have no idea if they help with recovery phsyiologically. Sequential compression is hardly new therapy. Been around for decades and there are medical benefits to the concept (preventing DVT, etc).

But at the end if the day, they feel awesome when they are on and help relax me in general during use (I usually nod off).

Damn if I know if they help me recover faster or make me faster on the bike, but I like using ‘em so i keep doing it!

Another Air Relax user here…not much to add other than they are one of the only recovery aids I consistently use. Others seem to come and go with me but, the boots I use every day I’m home.

+1 for Air Relax

Worth every bit of what you pay for them

You can save your money and read:

Recovery boots won’t directly help you recover, physiologically speaking. It may in fact feel good, make you believe you are recovering more thus improving your mood and resulting in a “better” recovery. However it’s not the boots but rather your belief in them (anticipatory affect, placebo affect).

Wow thanks to all your reactions. For me personally I had the chance to test them one day after the 7th week of General Build Mid Volume. It was to be hones a nice feeling and this is it. But the feeling was very good and motivated me, so even if they are just a placebo it can help you train harder, same with a massage.

cheers,
Chris

I think you missed the point about the value of using them simply because they feel good. That’s worth money.

This is what it comes down to for me…I have no idea if they help with recovery phsyiologically. Sequential compression is hardly new therapy. Been around for decades and there are medical benefits to the concept (preventing DVT, etc).

But at the end if the day, they feel awesome when they are on and help relax me in general during use (I usually nod off).

Damn if I know if they help me recover faster or make me faster on the bike, but I like using ‘em so i keep doing it!

Nah, there’s real data.

  1. # Effects of Compression Tights on Recovery Parameters after Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Study

Results

All 19 participants underwent their allocated treatment and passed through the project strictly according to the study protocol. MIES demonstrated significantly (p=0.003) lower overall reductions (155 N) after wearing compression tights. In parallel, lower extremity power significantly (p<0.001) varies between both conditions with lower reductions in favor of the compression condition. Of importance, full recovery for lower extremity muscle strength or power was still not reached 96 h postexercise.

Conclusion

Based on our results we recommend athletes wear compression tights for faster recovery, particularly after intense exercise with a pronounced eccentric aspect.

  1. Lower Limb Sports Compression Garments Improve Muscle Blood Flow and Exercise Performance During Repeated-Sprint Cycling

Evidence supporting the use of lower-limb compression garments during repeated-sprint exercise (RSE) with short rest periods, where performance will rely heavily on aerobic metabolism, is lacking.
A total of 20 recreationally active participants completed 2 cycling RSE sessions, with and without lower-limb compression tights. The RSE session consisted of 4 sets of 10 × 6-s maximal sprints on a wind-braked cycle ergometer, interspaced by 24 s of recovery between bouts and 2 min of recovery between sets. Muscle oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]) of, and blood flow (mBF) to, the right vastus lateralis muscle was measured during exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy and venous/arterial occlusions of the right lower limb. Cycling performance, oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]), heart rate, and capillary blood samples (lactate, pH, bicarbonate, and base excess) were also measured/taken throughout the session.

CONCLUSIONS:

Wearing lower-limb compression tights during RSE with short intervals of rest improved cycling performance, vastus lateralis mBF, and heart rate. These results provide novel data to support the notion that lower-limb compression garments aid RSE performance, which may be related to local and/or central blood flow.

  1. Positive effect of lower body compression garments on subsequent 40-kM cycling time trial performance.

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the effect of wearing graduated compression garments during recovery on subsequent 40-km time trial performance. In a randomized single-blind crossover experiment, 14 trained multisport male athletes (mean ± SD: age 33.8 ± 6.8 years, 40-km time 66:11 ± 2:10 minutes:seconds) were given a graduated full-leg-length compressive garment (76% Meryl Elastane, 24% Lycra) or a similar-looking noncompressive placebo garment (92% Polyester, 8% Spandex) to wear continuously for 24 hours after performing an initial 40-km time trial in their normal cycling attire. After the 24-hour recovery period, the compression (or placebo) garments were removed, and a second 40-km time trial was then completed to gauge the effect of each garment on subsequent performance. One week later, the groups were reversed and testing procedures repeated. The participant’s hydration status, nutritional intake, and training were similar before each set of trials. Performance time in the second time trial was substantially improved with compression compared with placebo garments (1.2 ± 0.4%, mean ± 90% confidence interval). This improvement resulted in a substantially higher average power output after wearing the compression garment compared with that after wearing the placebo garment (3.3 ± 1.1%). Differences in oxygen cost and rating of perceived exertion between groups were trivial or unclear. The wearing of graduated compressive garments during recovery is likely to be worthwhile and unlikely to be harmful for well-trained endurance athletes.

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