New Shimano Road groupset 1x12/13?

Does anyone have any updates about new Shimano?

I am considering a 1x system if comes out with 12 speed and will definitely choose 1x if it ends up to be 13 speed.

Reasoning…I won’t mind minor jumps and it brings down weight and saves some aero watts. Actual effective differences to speed and power.

Thoughts?

Shimano are normally pretty tight-lipped about upcoming announcements. Historically shimano road groupset announcements happen in May-June, but who knows what delays COVID might have caused in the supply chain this year. Or changes in the UCI calendar.

Also, most of the initial supply of new groupsets goes to OEM manufacturers, with parts for separate retail puchase only coming some months later if you want to upgrade/spec your own frameset.

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Usually Shimano isn’t that progressive and they react a little more to drivetrain trends. Not sure that 1x has really captured the road market just yet, so I wouldn’t expect Shimano to front that movement.

I could be wrong on that tho.

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There were sime patents from quite some time ago that featured Shimano 14 speed abd some more recently adopted tech. You can see them online. Highly unlikely, but who knows? :smiley:

Here’s an article about those patents, they sound pretty cool. Seems like the patent expired last year… the chain seems to be weirdest part of the system.

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I’ve been a 1x rider since 2010 and Shimano has always been behind Sram on this one. Shimano announced their 1x11 Gravel/Road and 1x12 MTB groups just a year ago. If Shimano was going to release a 1x12 Road drivetrain anytime soon, I think we would have seen it last year.

I don’t believe Shimano would have released a new 1x11 groupset based on a HG freehub body, and a year later release a new 1x12 groupset based on Microspline.

My guess is 2022 before Shimano releases a 1x12 Road.

Shimano is a very conservative company, I don’t see them skipping 12 speeds on the road and do 13. And they seem pretty big believers in 2x, even their new mountain bike groupsets have 2x options (even though the gear spacing of their 10-45 cassette is identical to their 10-51 cassette for most gears). That is despite the fact that higher-specced mountain bikes with 2x are quite rare these days. (The ones that do feature 2x usually feature older 10- or 11-speed groupsets.)

Moreover, I fully expect Shimano to release only its top-of-the-line DuraAce groupset and not Ultegra or 105. Those will probably come next year.

I’d go for SRAM Force eTap, which has the best bang for the buck. Of course, they should release mechanical versions of their 12-speed groupsets in the near future, too.

Or if you want a 13-speed groupset now, Rotor is your friend. They have a variety of cassettes from 10-36 all the way to 10-52 (yes, take that Shimano, we have one tooth more than you do :wink: ) Probably for road riding, I’d look at the 10-36 cassette or the 10-39 cassette. The latter has the exact same gearing as SRAM’s 10-33 cassette, just with a 39-tooth cog added onto it. That seems like a goldilocks cassette, which should cover most needs.

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Thanks a lot for the reply. Rotor is crazy expensive, heavy (over 2.5kg) and has bad gear changes from what I read. Force e-tap is a good option, but living in asia it is easier to get parts and to service Shimano. Often mechanics have zero experience of SRAM here, which.I learnt with a Force 22 groupset.

Weight-wise it lies between SRAM Red AXS eTap and Force AXS eTap and costs about the same as SRAM’s and Shimano’s top-end groupsets. It is a bit of a novelty, so access to spare parts is not easy.

I live in Japan, the motherland of Shimano, and while SRAM is rare here, it is not that rare amongst enthusiasts. Some team mates ride SRAM (eTap and mechanical) and I have seen others. If you live in a smaller city, then I can see getting it serviced will be a problem. I live in a city with a million inhabitants, and the two serious bike shops have experience with all three groupset manufacturers. It is true that since most online vendors got kinda strict with their policies to not send parts to Japan, which is definitely annoying. Also on the cycling forum for expats, plenty of people seem to ride SRAM. (Of course, the majority is still on Shimano, but that’s true for most of the world.)

Personally, my next road bike will have SRAM shifters, because I hate the ergonomics of Shimano STI levers (both, mechanical and electronic) with a passion.

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The only real downside is the revolver hub. Nobody else has adapted their hubs.

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Agreed, that’s the price you pay for 13 speeds. Their wheelsets seems to be reasonably priced, though.

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