Is my derailleur bent?

Dumb question. Is this bent? Shifting is all wack after crashing and I’ve never crashed so unsure if this is bent. Would rather ask here before LBS given the wait times right now.

Top pic sure seems to show an angle that should not be there. I think the frame derailleur hanger is bent, and needs to be straightened, preferably with a proper alignment gauge for best results. Or you can replace the hanger if you have access to one.

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Neither of those pics are particularly square so it’s impossible to say. But it’s very likely that your derailleur hanger is bent. Which is supposed to happen in a crash so that it takes the force instead of your derailleur ($10 vs $200). Though that first pic makes it look like the hanger is bent a fair amount. A bike shop should be able to straighten it out for you or sell you a new one.

The r8000 cage has that little bend in it. However especially looking at the first pic your hanger is 100% bent

Here’s my cage

Here’s your issue
image
Vs a straight hanger

I had the same problem on my MTB

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Looks bent, agree with others

Even if you have a shop straighten it for you, order a replacement. You should always have a spare hanger for your bike, particularly if you’re riding one that’s been bent and straightened

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It sure looks bent from the photos. How is the shifting? If your RD shifts are crisp, on target, and there are no skips with the chain, then maybe it’s not bent.

But, if you have some shifting gremlins messing with you and no matter how many times or which direction you turn the barrel adjuster, your chain manages to skip somewhere along the cassette, odds are it’s bent.

Thanks all. Shifting is uh, no bueno. Some shifts are fine but when shifting into the low gears in the back, the hanger hits the wheel spokes. Never had to change/replace one before so obviously very new to this aspect.

  • Already stated in the OP:

Yea the further inboard you go the more “off” the derailleur becomes because those lines I drew cross and then get further apart. Changing hangers on Di2 is cake, mine was held in with a few screws and then the derailleur bolts to it. Should be a 3 minute job. I went with Wheels MFG for my replacement it cost $17

That would be - the derailleur cage is hitting the spokes. The hanger is the bit of frame (replaceable in most cases) on which the derailleur is mounted.

Park DAG-1 is the DIY solution - it will probably cost the same as the visit to the shop. The next time you bend a hanger, you’ll be ahead financially :smile:

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One should really do a hanger alignment after replacing a hanger, however. You have no other way of telling if the frame and hanger faces mate exactly, if there was any deformation of the hanger mounting points on the frame, etc.

Yes. I see that too.

Yes, both look bent to me. Your hanger is bent and needs to be squared (Easy adjustment), but get a new hanger as a backup.

Your derailleur cage looks bent/twisted. I’m not sure how that’s possible.

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My skim reading fails me again.
Sorry 'bout that.

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I have this one, and used it at least half a dozen times already. It’s definitely worth it. If QR dropouts were still a thing, I have the frame alignment tool too. I’ve used that a few times, when steel bikes with QR were a thing.

There are cheaper ones on eBay, but could be clones/ripoffs. The best part of the tool is the little rod in the middle, that slides up and down to always align against the same part of the rim, and to move out of the way to bend the hanger. There are other tools that don’t have that, or have it fixed in one spot. That’s a non-starter.

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The real DIY solution is to screw an extra rear wheel into the RD hanger and using that to straighten

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I never thought of that! That’s pretty neat. I still prefer the tool. :slight_smile: but this is really good.

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Notice how he’s doing an alignment because he replaced the hanger?

I’m not sure what you are saying, you need to align a hanger whether you replace a hanger or not. They aren’t necessarily straight even when new.

Its an old school way, used by many mechanics especially on steel frames

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That was my point 7-8 posts ago.