Big climbs in the vicinity of Florida

It’s not W/kg in my humble opinion, it’s being able to hold a high % ftp for a “long” time. Although you didn’t say how long. Where I live a long climb can be 1.5 to 3 hours.

Climbing time for myself is based on 3W/kg FTP and climbing at 2.5W/kg or 85% ftp. If you are 5W/kg the total climbing time at 85% ftp goes down.

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Honestly the person talking about 6gap is right. As a Florida boy myself I recommend the north Georgia option for something close. Specifically just go up to Dahlonega (where the event occurs). The roads are nice and you can have a mix of climbs with regards to gradient and the cycling vibe there is solid. It is definitely worth a weekend trip. Helen and Cleveland are also near by and options to stay at. It is a drive sure, but you will get what you are looking for and then some depending on how you climb and what climb you do.

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Due to momentum, on the flats you have a smaller powerstroke. Basically the force you apply at 12 and 6 oclock is less. On climbs, where you are going slower, you have a larger powerstroke that starts earlier and ends later. This is really obviois on a trainer doing an interval on the lowest gear and in the highest gear. The same happens outside. Yes you can be a really good climber by putting out the power on flats, but people typically find it easier to put out the same wattage on climbs due to the larger powerstroke.

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It’s all w/kg. If you have the watts you can kind of ignore the kg. If you don’t have the kg then you can go easier on the watts. If you have the watts and also don’t have the kg, well then it’s a very good day for you lol. Those skinny climbers were not fun to try to keep up with going up, but on the descent it was the reverse for them.

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I live in a mountainous place now. This feeling you’re describing is the constant tension you experience when climbing. When the road points up, when you let up, you slow down. There is no coasting, micro-rests due to momentum, etc…

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Respectfully I’m comparing myself to myself, and my weight and ftp don’t change much. It really does come down to how long I can hold power at high % ftp. That’s the one variable I can have the most control over.

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That makes sense. Even if I’m shot I can make decent pace on the flats but on the climbs if everything isn’t perfect then it’s like throwing down an anchor.

Joe

What I usually do when I’m going somewhere new and looking for climbs is just use Strava. Go to segment explorer, then start filtering by climb cat.

For example, if I focus on only cat 1 and HC, the closest to Florida are in North Georgia. One called Mill Creek and one called West Jacks + Brasstown.

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Strava segment explorer is a great tool, plus you can pull up recent rides on the segment and look for good routes.

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Exactly. Like a weekend getaway. As many said climbing is more about ability to hold higher % of your ftp and Watts/KG ratio. What differentiate the real climbers from others is the ability not to fade after 30+min effort. Keep in mind not all lighter riders are good climbers and some heavier guys can climb pretty well.

On flats you can practice out of the saddle efforts and shifting body positions in the saddle, this will help you to climb better.

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https://www.strava.com/segments/5418428

and

https://www.strava.com/segments/841666

Handy! Yet confirming it’s 8 hours away, so, darn. Hafta consider if the juice is worth the squeeze. Would 1 or 2 weekends of climbing make a difference? I’m guessing probably not and even if it did, a couple of quality workouts and good sleep might make more of a difference. Leaning towards elevating the front end of the bike on a trainer and riding like that to simulate the climbing position.

I really prefer watts/cda vs. watts/kg!

Joe

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I don’t think going to the mountains once or twice a year is going to make that big of a difference. Living in Florida myself best bang for the buck has to be low cadence work. Try doing your next sweet spot or threshold workout at 60 to 70 RPM.
I personally wouldn’t drive eight hours to ride a mountain unless it’s an event or I’m staying for a few days. Well for me to go to North Georgia for some good mountains would be about 10 hours. Sounds expensive but that’s just my opinion. I came in top 10/70 of my age group at Belgian waffle ride in Asheville without riding a single mountain.

The Damen bridge by the costco at Diversey/Clybourne has got a solid 15 feet.

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I used to do this in the late 90s, stacking like 3 yellow pages, doing low cadence sweetspot while watching Seinfeld reruns when I was in grad school :smile:

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This is such a hilariously specific reference it made me laugh out loud :joy:

That bridge is like a mile away from my house haha

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And you can fuel your ride with a $1.50 hotdog or a chicken bake. What’s not to love? :rofl:

It might be a parking structure, honestly.

I trained on one in Houston, which is as flat as Florida

In all seriousness…the only place to get legit elevation is to go ride boat ramp repeats on the north shore. Theres one in highland park we do sometimes. But IMO the key to elevation is just understanding it doesnt matter…what you really care about is power. And you dont need a hill to put out power.

The hill to Tower Road beach? That’s the one I use for 30s-40s vo2 repeats.

Also, Cricket Hill in the city is good for the same thing if you have a MTB.

:rofl: I couldn’t help myself…

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