Anyone using a Whoop?

Thanks. It was so long ago, I can’t remember if it was the early Whoop, early Fenix, or early AW. Glad to hear that’s gone if it was the early Whoop.

Yeah. I had a similar experience. Wrote a long winded response way up there. Alcohol has a massive impact on HRV but that has nothing to do with your muscle fibers and whether or not they are rested and ready. I’ve had incredible days on the bike with terrible readiness scores because I had some drinks the night before.

The device just doesn’t record HR accurately. Considering that all of the data whoop offers is a byproduct of HR I find it hard to trust any of it. If the HR data is inaccurate then the HRV data is inaccurate, which means the strain data is inaccurate, which means the sleep data is most likely inaccurate, which means the recovery score is inaccurate, which means all the information I’m getting is inaccurate.

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I heard the bicep band is much more accurate if you are willing to give that a shot.

I have had some accuracy issues with my wrist band but keeping it 1.5-2” from my wrist bone has generally given me very accurate readings long terms.

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I’ve heard the bicep band is much better and if that’s the case I don’t know why it isn’t the default way of using whoop rather than something I have to buy later.

I wear mine on the wrist but with the sensor on the inside. I’ve just always worn watches that way.

I get inaccurate readings when wearing my Whoop on my wrist when cycling (or anything else where my arm/wrist was mining a ton or getting bounced around. I went back to wearing a Garmin Tickr HR strap on rides and also eventually got a Whoop bicep strap. I’ve done many rides with both the Tickr stap and Whoop bicep band and the min, max and average HR numbers are constantly within 1 or 2 beats of each other. I’m confident enough in the wrist strap accuracy when sleeping etc to use the HRV etc data but it reads high on the bike.

I love my bicep band. I wear it most days as I like wearing regular watches and don’t want something on both wrists.

My cynical theory is that it’s easier to sell accessories for a wrist band that is visible as opposed to a bicep band that would typically not be visible.

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Whoop has currently a 1 Month Free Trial. I’m a Garmin Fenix user and never cared for a device subscription that I have to commit to for 6 months or longer. So when I saw the 1 Month Free Trial I jumped on it because I wanted to compare it to my Body Battery data. Turns out you have to pay 12€ for shipping it back if you don’t commit to a plan after the trial period. Just a heads up for anyone who’s tempted to try it for one month.

Just be aware – unless they’ve changed – certain features require 21 days in order to establish baseline. So you won’t see full functionality within the first month.

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I began the transition from Whoop to Vivosmart 5. I will not be renewing Whoop in October. What it does is overall positive, the price however is a big negative since the combo of a Vivosmart and Edge computer checks all the boxes I’m concerned about.

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For me it wasn’t even about the data. I‘m just not a bracelet guy. The fabric got wet and stayed wet for longer than I‘d liked. It was constantly in the way when carrying my son. It would flip over when swimming. And lastly I won’t stop wearing a watch, especially the Garmin with the torch, alarm, timer and so on. Got way more use out of the watch than the whoop. My whoop-curiosity was cured after 6 days wearing it.

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Ok, so I have the impression based on the article that it will offer personalized responses based on your actual WHOOP data. Will be curious to try it out and see how well it can actually deliver against the promise.

I used it for about 3 years and in the mean time other devices have come out that are a better fit for me.

It was really interesting to see what people were seeing with COVID. I think that’s where they got a big membership push.

I think it’s Okay if you think the $30 is worth it and you don’t have another device that covers some of the same items. I the biggest take-away I got from it was how to interpret the various measurements. Was it worth what I paid? :man_shrugging:t2:

What are the other devices that you like better?

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Work better? I switched to a Garmin Vivosmart 5 as it does everything except HRV as you need to bump up to a watch released in the last couple of years, which I don’t have.

For me it’s sleep tracking and SpOx, HRV would be a nice to have.

I might go there, as the Fenix 6 does HRV and is no longer the latest and greatest so can be had for less, also Forerunners and Epix have it as well. Not sure about Apple Watch.

Mostly I just wanted to get away from the subscription which I no longer felt I was getting as much value out of.

I am curious to try it but I am skeptical: seems more like a gimmick to appease a fad.

Kind of hoping this announcement was Whoop 5.0.

Me too. It kind of tells me you can’t trust the answers.

I think the measurements they are trying to make are legit. How each one can or is leveraged within the scheme of training and is worth the tune of $30 a month is quite a different story. If you or or coach don’t know what to do with a given measurement, then what’s it worth? $30 a month for a sleep tracker? I’ve decided that for me, no, not worth it, but thanks for showing me some of the possibilities.

TrainerRoad better watch out. Whoop Coach just arrived!

/sarcasm


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