When to stand and get out of saddle on TR workouts?

I have strongly avoided getting out of the saddle as nearly all TR text suggests to avoid this aside from a few drills. I have only used it a couple times as a type of bailout to hang on through an interval. I also ride with 11-34 cassette in a hilly area and I don’t have to get out of saddle nearly as much as others I ride with. I suspect it’s probably good for me on long ride efficiency.

But on the road, I do use it more than TR for either very high power bursts up to 60 seconds, for variety to break up a long climb, or as a more extended bailout to keep power up on a long climb.

None of the TR workouts I’ve seen ask for 30 sec efforts at 2x+ of FTP, so what type and how much should I consider getting out of saddle to build that strength without cheating the workout, but also making sure I train for how I will ride?

I should also mention that seated, I do up to 110 rpms on really hard vo2max or long threshold intervals, so out of saddle is a huge difference in cadence. Here too, TR almost always encourages the higher cadence, which means seated.

I can’t name any, but on the tri plans there are a few sessions that do ask you to get out of the seat. Up the gears, drop the cadence but try to keep the power output the same.

I also do it on going endurance workouts when I want a break.

Like you I’m not training sprinting so I don’t see the high power outputs you’re talking about, but it would be inefficient on a decent length ride to go to double your FTP

Check out Basin and its variants! Enjoy :rofl:

I generally only stand to get the blood flowing to the boys.

Typically i’ll do that at the start of an interval, so for the first 10 seconds and then i’ll sit for the remainder. I find that my legs instantly start screaming if i get up part way through the interval, so i try to avoid it!

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