SRAM Force AXS vs Shimano Ultegra Di2

When I get tucked into my “aero hoods” position, I find them fairly easy to use…but even then there is usually a backward bend I need to do with my wrist.

The actual button seems to need to be moved forward just a touch and require a lighter actuation, IMO.

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Yeah, not really. Everyone has different priorities. I’ve been running both for years and there are things I prefer on both sides of the fence. It’s silly to say one is the clear step up over the other. On bikes where I’m constantly monkeying with gearing and RD choice, SRAM is the clear winner. On my road race bike that I seldom mess with, I find DI2 superior. If I had to pick one vendor to standardize on, it would have to be SRAM and it’s not even close. But that’s me and I know others would chose differently given their priorities.

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yeah I’m with you on that. Shimano shifting ‘feels’ crisper but having recently ridden on Shimano, its not a big deal. I’m still happy with my SRAM AXS and prefer the removable batteries and tapping left for an easier gear, and tapping right for a bigger gear. Honestly the front shift is not that laggy, on Saturday I watched it over and over and it is fast but for whatever reason it ‘feels’ faster on Shimano. And I prefer the SRAM crank with integrated power, it just works. If you want more than one set of SRAM Red chainrings, well that requires another integrated power meter and does come at a premium. But if you really were swapping chainrings a lot then with SRAM only its either go Force, or pay for Red.

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As soon as SRAM launched the original E-tap, it seemed obvious that the left/right approach was better. Holding onto the “old way” because mechanical shifters had that limitation seems dumb to me. I have all my shimano DI2 stuff programmed to work like that also (big paddles for RD, small paddles for FD).

Yeah, Red cranks are a non-starter for me because of that. I swap rings and also swap between 1x and 2x on my Quarq/Force spider/crank. Such a good design.

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Ever since electronic was introduced, my biggest gripe has been that everyone just basically mimic’d mechanical shifting. Electronic systems offered the ability for a paradigm shift in rider experience and instead, everyone just said “It is the same, but easier to push.”

Lazy. Heck, even Mavic offered a different experience with Zap and them Mektronic (still love the old Mektronic shifters)

SRAM deserves credit for rethinking the game and introducing something new in terms of experience.

I have contemplated reprogramming my Di2 buttons exactly as you describe above, but just haven’t gotten around to it yet.

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Sram mechanical has been doing this for at least a decade. It didn’t originate with E-tap.

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SRAM mechanical “double tap” was a game changer w the single paddle, but it was still limited to rd on the right shifter and ld on the left. They couldn’t do the up and down on separate shifters until etap was launched.

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