How to transfer bike fit with different saddles

What’s the best way to transfer a bike fit while using different saddles? Obviously can’t use nose of saddle to measure setback with different saddles. Easy to say to pick the spot where you sit, but hard to identify in practice with any accuracy. I’ve heard of taking the 80m wide point of the saddle as a common reference point between saddles but not sure if this is accurate.

Any thoughts on the best appraoch?

Very tough if you want to exact or close as possible. The true answer is ideally you can have a fitter take a look again and check your knee angles and setback.

This is the way:

Most accurate way I’ve found to measure and take reference points.

If you sit in different places or suspect it’s fit related, video yourself and use MyVeloFit before and after.

(Edit - I’ll also try and look where I want my sitbones positioned on the saddle and use that point as the fore/aft measurement reference, and try to match that location to my current fit best I can)

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My bike fitter uses the saddle midpoint (length divided by 2). I noticed that my Specialized Ronin comes with a marking at its midpoint.

I’d take measurements from the widest point of the saddle as it’s likely the best measuring point that has a close relation to where your sit bones rest when riding.

These days there are major differences in saddle length, so measuring from the front, back, or mid-point might not be super accurate.

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Yes, this is the way. 80mm. Ben Delaney has a great YT video on how to transfer bike fit between bikes. Probably no one performs this activity more than him!

Bigger issue I’ve found is saddle tilt. Some saddles are much more curved. Do you just put the level on the two high points? (nose and rear?)

yup agree with the 80mm spot. Its totally arbitrary but its a starting point to measure off of.
I just use my iphone level pressed up against the 80mm width for tilt. Its accurate enough that I can feel out the rest as I go

I picked up one of these fitting tools from Ryden Bike.

It’s super handy, and includes a jig to find the 80mm section of the saddle, precisely measure from there to BB center (with adapters for different cranks), and a little tool to measure from saddle waist to hood tops/troughs. I’ve used it to replicate fits across several different bikes with good success. It’s all 3D printed and plastic, but it works well and I think the price is reasonable.

This isn’t the exact answer but I literally have the same saddle on all bikes (road, CX, mtb). I have 4 of them - all the same saddle. Why not just buy the same saddle?

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Can someone clarify what the “80mm” thing is? I’ve never heard this.

Just grab a tape measure or your calipers. Looking from above straight down at the topside of your saddle, find the line where the saddle measures 80mm left to right. It is generally about the mid-point of the saddle. The idea here is this is the point you are likely to sit given the average pelvic geometry.

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Sadly, some of us are on saddle #6 and are still searching for our personal holy grail…

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Just to add some pictures & info to expand on the tools some people use with this mid-width location.

image

The Ryden tool mentioned above, is also adjustable width:

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