Emonda 2021 New Pictures

Praise be, threaded T47 bottom bracket

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I currently have a 2017 SL5, it is on it’s 3rd BB and going into local trek dealer this week to have one of the new oversized bb90 fitted. I contacted Trek directly to find out if they recommend having this done and if it affects bike warranty? Their response was that this can be dine once only, the bike then needs to be sent to Trek to have the BB re shelled.
I love my emonda apart from this issue but won’t buy another until they go with the T47.

The new one is T47.

https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/download/file.php?id=82524&mode=view

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Ditto, confirmed threaded now.

Great news

Hey Chad you work in a Trek store I think… BB90 hasn’t been an issue for me but I read comments like this all over the Internet. I’m heavy and ride rough roads. Had to replace the bearings (a few cracked) at ~5,000 miles and current set are at 15K miles. What’s the deal with press fit vs threaded?

Yeah, I do part time and we sell Trek AND Specialized. The basic issue with PF BB is that tolerances can vary and on some bikes, ends with creaking noise when the bearings start floating a bit in the bearing seats. Lots of bodge fixes can be applied with varying success.

Not all PF BB’s creak, but they do happen. And when they start, it’s a pain to fix. I’ve had good luck with all my PF BB bikes, but I have seen friends and customers with repeat issues, and it’s beyond annoying for all involved.

Threaded still has bearing pressed in the bearing shell, but it’s a metal interaction in most cases, and the machining tolerances seem better than the plastic cups so often used in PF BB frames. So primary bearing interface with a threaded BB is superior in nearly all cases. Then the fact that the bearing assembly can be installed and torqued nearly eliminates any chance for creeks. It can happen in rare cases, but not usually when proper installation is done.

And the threaded is something any competent home mechanic can do with simple tools. PF BB maintenance and repair takes more specialized tools and is more tricky to get right. So threaded wins out on a lot of fronts.

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I’d be using the BBInfinite solution at this point if I were you.

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/road-bikes/performance-road-bikes/émonda/c/B211/?sort=price-desc&pageSize=72&q=%3Arelevance%3AnewFlag%3ANEW#

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So…kind of related. While I try to find a frame to build I have one concern from past experiences with securing saddles. A Trek rep said they don’t offer 7x9 saddle caps. Can y’all share your experiences using 7x9 oval rails in the 7x10 oval caps Trek uses on their caps?

Mine weren’t great.

Here’s the link :slight_smile:

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I have seen it in person at a local dealer and must say the spacer situation looks hideous on an otherwise good looking bike.

Slam it or forget it if you want the new emonda :rofl:

I have not seen this version yet, but the high spacer cosmetic issue is a common one for any of the aero or integrated front ends. Tall just looks odd in those cases.

I don’t know but I think maaaybe there was a press embargo on the Trek Emonda that ended an hour ago?

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Yeah, same as any big model release we see these days.

Love it but can’t justify the purchase for myself. I have a 2016 emonda SL kitted up just how I want it, and if I sell it I’d have to add $3000 or so to get the SL7, which would have worse wheels and bars than what I have now, and only be marginally faster.

I’m still faster than the vast majority of my friends on aero bikes, so no need to go spend the money yet, or ever if these guys never get on the TR train

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Yeah man but disc brakes are awesome. I can’t see myself going back to rim brakes after making the transition over to discs

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Oh for sure, but I live outside of Philadelphia so the most mountain stuff we have is 2000ft and it’s a 2 hour drive. I never really “need” discs, but I do agree they are better and I’d still buy a disc version of whatever if I was buying any bike today

Just read the Bikeradar reviews. Looks like a nice, well rounded bike overall. Would definitely consider it if looking for a new road bike.

However see little reason to upgrade from my current Emonda SLR. The new frame is slightly heavier but does have some aero benefit. Not huge though - I believe they quoted 15 seconds climbing Alpe d’Huez but a little more on the flats. I just purchased a second wheelset for my SLR, Enve Foundation 65’s, for some added aero benefit on the flats and may get an aero bar as well. While maybe not as aero as the new bike, should be pretty close. When I head to the hills, can put the Aeolus 3 TLR D3 wheelset back on.

However with road bikes evolution and not revolution is likely what one can expect given the maturity of the technology.

This follows the change in knowledge and resulting shift that aero typically matters more than weight. Spesh as well with the new Tarmac, is moving in the more mild-aero direction. The Tarmac and Emonda creep into the range of the more aero options (Venge and Madone) and it leads to more confusion about which to choose. The Madone with IsoSpeed has more notable difference compared to the Venge, but still a close comparison between the aero and lite bikes.

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