There's No Good Reason to Buy a Carbon Bike 💩

Sorry, I had a Trek 2300 with Shimano DA 7400, and it was the wettest noodle bike I ever ridden on. Mine was 1989, and I couldn’t wait to dump it. I worked in a shop that carried mainly Treks so I wasn’t too much in the red. I switched over to a Specialized shop closer to home next year and sold a few Allez. It was on par with the 2300. All summer jobs during college. Both remind me of the Vitus 979 and equally bad investments if you want to ride it. The Vitus looks cool in the attics of the campus bike shop where I also worked. The bike manager hid it away because he was so embarrassed and could have been fired for misuse of student union fees for stocking such junk.

Carbon tubes with white lugs / stays?

  • No need to apologize. I don’t own any of those I mentioned above.

  • Outside of my typical admiration for the history of bikes, build materials and techniques, I have no allegiance to the Trek or any other bike of the era. I certainly wasn’t holding any of those up as prime examples of performance and never stated anything even close to that.

  • I just like the looks of them more than anything.

No, it’s polished aluminum. The “lower” lines had painted lugs.

I got hit by a car on my carbon XC bike. I continued to ride it until it was stolen a few years later. Never once thought about it after doing an inspection.

Tossed my current carbon enduro down some doozies. Missing a lot of paint now, but the carbon is solid. Not even on the back of my mind when I’m 10 feet up looking down at my target landing point.

I went to carbon wheels because I was tired of destroying aluminum ones.

Personally, I feel like a metal bike is a waste of money. Spend once, cry once. My enduro bike is the exact model of bike I bought as an aluminum version. And yes, the carbon version makes me happier.

I had a Trek 2500. I loved that frame! I never found it to be a noodle. The ride was super smooth. Looked similar to this but with Campagnolo Record:

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Yeah, mine had the white lugs / stays…(not my actual bike in the pic)


I ripped the head tube out of the main traingle in a crit outside Cincinnati shortly after I bought it. Big crash, riders all over the road…I went off to the side and a rider was on all fours right in front of me. Placed my front wheel perfectly between his cheeks and flipped over the top…

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That looks like a second or third gen offering. Mine was first gen with aluminum stays.

I think the only difference was the paint and components. It was my first bike with full DA. My biggest mistake was selling an Eddy Merckx Corsa with C-Record and Chorus mix for it.

Genuine ask: then why a carbon fork? The same advantages you get from a carbon fork you get from a carbon frame which is high stiffness to weight. But at the expense of fracturing vs yielding. A fork failing is usually worse than a frame failing as well.

That’s just how the bike came. Chumba doesn’t manufacture steel forks. I have no concerns about an ENVE fork failing, but if I was building this bike again my goal would be to go steel. There’s something special about a classic steel bike.

I’ve recently parted ways with this particular bike, and the Chumba I’m on now has a steel fork on it half of the time and a 34 SC for the rest. :grin:

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For the off-topic Carbon + Metal frame side:

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Man those are sweet.

Also I really want to build a Tesla swapped volvo Amazon wagon, and that article is not good for my ADHD.

Another friend’s top tube just cracked from a minor crash. This bike was around $10k, with such a nice paint job.

I think Framework is certainly one of the most impressive builders out there right now. He’s milling his own cranks and has brought PF BB back to life with his precision.

I didn’t know he made his own carbon tubing though… :anguished:

Looks like he’s got Solidworks down pat too. :sweat_smile:

Super cool!

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