Gravel race tires 2024

Based on what you said will be the majority of your riding, I’d just opt for the added comfort and not worry too much about whether there is a marginal difference in speed (either way).

2 Likes

Since you mentioned snow melt - a 45c tire will also float over soft dirt and mud much better than a 38c during mud season, so you’ll pick up some speed there. It’ll also roll over early spring washboard much better.

But like others have said, it’ll most likely be an insignificant change in speed for a significant improvement in comfort.

What region are you in? I’ve got a Revolt Advanced Pro that’ll fit 700x53c and I’m super happy with it, but the N+1 bike itch is really gnawing at me for something even bigger during the long New England mud seasons.

1 Like

Do you run narrower tires in addition to those two? I actually have S-Works Pathfinder 42, 48 HD Thunderos and 2.1 ThunderBurts for my new Seigla. The latter two are still in packaging.

But I’m debating on getting 44 HD Thunderos instead of the 48, thinking the 48s would be too closer to ThunderBurts in width. Paralysis analysis.

Curious what your experiences will be. I am getting a Seigla in May and am thinking those exact same tires. Would like to do the 48 Thunderos without the HD, but not sure if the HD would be better for what I am doing (BWR North Carolina), if I will need the extra protection of HD, or if just going 2.1 is the way to go.

Currently on 38s with a rigid fork and feeling a little beat up after 50 miles or so of gravel.

I used both 38 and 42 Pathfinder Pros on the rims before - the 38s were 39-40mm and the 42s were 44-45mm. DT Swiss G540 rims.

The 2.1 Thunder Burt is still a fair bit bigger and taller than the Thundero, definitely feels like a step-up wrt capability and compliance.

I’m in New Brunswick, Canada. And yes, you’re right. When I passed on some sectors as you describe, there was a significant speed reduction. No float at all, hard to pedal.

It looks like the 45s it is. Now have to choose one. I liked this Maxxis Reaver Reaver - MAXXIS US any thoughts?

What do you run most of the time and/or prefer? I originally wanted one normal tire (pathfinder, thundero) and one rowdier…but now have 3 sets of tires.

IMO, there are better tires for both rolling efficiency and puncture protection. I know you said you aren’t concerned about speed, but losing 10W+ due to tire choice might be worth thinking about.

I’m really not familiar with gravel tires, what would be the starting point? Pathfinder? Terra speed?

The starting point is wherever you already are. A great resource for data on rolling resistance and puncture protection is www.bicyclerollingresistance.com. Personally, for fast-rolling tires, I really like the Tufo Thundero and Pirelli Cinturato H, but there are others that would fit the needs you’ve described, including the Pathfinder and Terra Speed.

My demands are a little different, and include a fair amount of time on twisty singletrack that is sometimes mildly chunky. Cornering grip is important to me, so I run a grippy front tire with a fast rear tire. From what you’ve described, front end grip is less of a concern, so I would look to optimize rolling efficiency at both ends.

1 Like

The Thunder Burt - and I think Super Ground is the way to go. My puncture was on Super Race apparently right outside the puncture belt.

The Thundero is a fine tire and if that was all that fit it would be a good choice, since of my two gravel race bikes one is clearance limited to 42 and the other 2.1/2.2 it doesn’t fit in my situation now that I’ve tested it vs the TB. I plan to stay with Thunder Burts in the future with Rocket Ron on the front for rain events.

I really wanted to try the Race King but I had such bad luck with the sidewalls and bead of Continental tires I’m abstaining from diving back into that brand.

Have 2x Thundero HD 700x48 in the box if anyone is looking.

You might be onto something there.

You might want to re-think the rain plan. I went with Racing Rays in a freak rain race and they had no more traction, however the knobs just filled in with perma-mud leaving me with 3 lb or whatever tires that had no more grip, but rolled horribly. Bonk city. Noticed the podium all stuck with their Aspens and Burts with little center tread to get caked in mud. It left me wondering if the whole concept of a ‘mud tire’ should even exist.

The problem with this is disc alignment and wheel dish.

You can “boost” a regular 100mm front hub if it has a 6-bolt rotor. Just add 5mm to each end cap and a spacer behind the rotor.

For the rear, you have to do all 6mm on the non-drive side to maintain cassette alignment, which means you have to dish the wheel slightly, which means you need 6-bolt rotor AND a hub/rim that have spoke lengths that allow the re-dish.

If you have CL rotors, you don’t have options at either end (at least not that I’ve seen). I suppose you machine some sort of offset disc carrier to go from CL to 6-bolt with the right alignment, but I haven’t seen anybody make that.

1 Like

Ah right OK thats basically what I was getting at with my comment about rotor/cassette being further outboard on boost. Thanks for confirming!

Pathfinder 47, personally I’m going with the “nobody ever got fired for buying an IBM” philosophy. Effective, safe, proven choice and I don’t want to think about it more than that, though I’m sure there are better options out there.

2 Likes

I went back to pull the trigger on a pair of these, and they are out of stock. Availability…“More than 6 months”. Bummer.

1 Like

Looks like they have them in black for ~$36 before shipping :thinking:

1 Like

Thanks! I didn’t even look at other options.

EDIT: They only have 1 in stock :frowning:

1 Like