Are rim brake carbon wheels a good investment?

Wow, lol through Amazon.ca (I’m Canadian) they are $717 CAD. Think I would go iCan or Hunt or something for that money.

In rip off Britain they’re £476. At today’s prices and no commission that $723 ca :roll_eyes:

If you have a rim brake bike, yes, they are a good investment. There’s no reason you shouldn’t get at least 5-10 years out of them.

FWIW, I got a set of Farsports wheels for $600 ($740 now). I was sold on all the good reviews on Weight Weenies plus mine have DT Swiss 350 hubs. I’d rather have a chinese name brand from a manufacturer over a $350 set of wheels with Bitex hubs from a reseller. My top pics would be Farsports or Light Bicycle for Chinese wheels.

IMO, there is zero reason to spend $1500 on carbon wheels.

The other thing I wanted to say about brake pad is that when I first got my wheels, braking was horrible and wet braking was pucker inducing. After a week or riding and bedding in the pads, the braking performance got 10 times better. With any future wheels, I think I’d do a bedding in procedure before riding them.

Is you ask about the durability I think their lifespan is about 3-5 years. And performance-wise I wouldn’t want to use them in wet conditions.

I understand that sentiment perfectly. I’m a father to two young children, which is why I bought a used mountain bike with good components. In view of that, another option would be to simply pocket the money and put it aside for a new bike. What has helped me is put a life span on a bike. I overextended the life span of my previous mountain bike, the suspension was hanging on by a thread with dried seals and such. (A service in Japan would have cost me several hundred Euros/dollars.) The groupset (save for the cranks and the trigger shifter for the front derailleur) were all EOL, my wheels out of true with rusted spokes, rotors that needed replacement, …

Road bikes may live longer, because offroad kilometers are a lot harder on bikes than onroad kilometers, and they are fully rigid. Still I don’t think I’ll keep my bike for as long next time. I’m trying to attach a life span to the bikes I have, and save up for a replacement in time.

My (unsolicited) advice: don’t test ride the Strada Due. I test rode a Strada a few years ago and fell in love/was completely screwed. I saved up for over two years and now have my own. It is one of the two best road bikes I have ever ridden. (The other is the BMC Teammachine SLR01, which is a different bike. The Teammachine is a Porsche 911, extremely capable and supremely balanced. The 3T Strada feels more aggressive, more like a GT3 or GT3 RS.)

I have to reply since i really dont agree with u and based on personal experience that they have lifespan of 3-5 years…

Im 95% on Carbon Wheelset (Campagnoo Bora One Tubulars), and riding a lot of climbs (where i live plenty of climbs some of them really steep).

On one pair of Bora’s i have there is more than 20000km and they look brand new… Almost no wear at all on brake tracks, or i cant notice it… Same situation with second pair which have more than 15000km…

I believe i’ll use the same wheelset at least another 50000km based on how they look like at a moment…

And i like them that much that i bought a spare brand new same wheelset while there was possible… Since everyone switched to Disc brakes it was very good price as well…

I realized for my self that i prefer Rim Brakes, and decide to stay as long as possible like this…

Regarding rain, it’s not the best experience but with AC3 Campagnolo is not that bad… Anyway im riding on the rain ONLY if Rain caught me on the ride…

If durability is your investment criteria I don’t think aluminum or carbon is more or less durable than the other. If my mountain and gravel rims are any indication of how much carbon hoops can take take it from me they can take as much as aluminum. The durability issues will probably be hub spoke related which is build dependent.

It matters when it matters. I think the biggest issue I had with rim carbon hoops were heat dissipation on long fast descents and wet grimy descents. After that modulation. Lots of info on all three topics. Disc out performs in every department IMO. If you ride mostly flat and dry then the gap is minimal.

After riding various carbon hoops since 2007 until 2020 when I went disc for road IMO…no.

This might be a little off-topic since you specified carbon wheels, but if aero is what you’re after and the thought of reduced breaking on carbon is your primary concern, have you considered deep section wheels with aluminum brake track?

I bought a used set of HED RC5 PLUS for $600 to upgrade my CAAD10. Aero carbon fairing on an aluminum hoop. Shimano C40/C50 are another option. I ride mostly flatland but also like being able to do bigger climbs and descend without worrying about heat buildup in carbon, and rain isn’t a big bother either.