Silca's 'Ultimate Tubeless Sealant' is made from recycled carbon fibre

Throw out your glitter additives now, we got the real deal carbon fiber whoosh whoosh go fast mix now

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I’ve got a lot of faith in what Silca comes out with, so ordered a couple of bottles and will give it a try. I mainly used Stan’s Race Sealant the last couple of seasons. Stan’s took care of most punctures except for one sidewall puncture during Big Sugar than needed a Dynaplug. Will be interesting to see how the Silca sealant compares.

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Did you order the replenisher? That is probably the most appealing new part to me

Silca has come up with a strategy to counter this issue - instead of replacing your sealant regularly, after initially filling your tyre with Ultimate Tubeless Sealant (into the tyre itself, not through the valve as it’ll clog), you can revitalise your setup with a shot of Ultimate Tubeless Sealant Replenisher (this time into the valve. The replenisher is basically the sealant without the fibres, and a bit more solvent to refresh the liquid inside that is yet to totally dry out, and should be added every three months

I rotate through a few bikes and wheelsets that will sit for months so sometimes they need a topoff but maybe not more sealant

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I did. I figured that will be ideal for my road bike where I don’t tend to change out the tires for long periods of time. I’ll set them up with the Silca sealant and then top off during the season.

On XC and gravel bike I tend to switch up tires more often based on terrain and whether racing or not. I am using Tubolight inserts on the gravel and XC bikes this season, so will be interesting to see how the sealant gets along with them.

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Just got confirmation from Josh that the Silca sealant is compatible with inserts as well.

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Hmmmm…not certain how I feel about have to put in the sealant before mounting the tires. Especially given how hoard some tubeless tires can be to mount. Seems like a recipe for a major mess.

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Based on my experience, it will vary. Some setups are an absolute piece of cake with no issues, while others bring out the full dictionary of expletive’s. Inserts have a habit of amping up the difficulty in most cases I have seen.

I suspect there are cases here that are great for this requirement while others may mean it’s best to use a different sealant. Dry fitting to see how hard a setup is may be worthwhile before committing to a specific sealant which means likely having at least two options on hand.

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I am curious as to how clogged our valves will get since you can’t even pour it through the main valve body.

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That’s the thing I’m unsure about as well. I frequently get sealant being blown out of the valve when pushing in the valve core. Will this clog the valve stem?

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I’m looking forward to trying. What I’ll do to set up new tires that are fussy, I’ll mount them first without sealant. Let the sit for 24 hours with a higher pressure than I run. Then break the bead and add sealant the next day.

I bet it will cause valve stems to need to be replaced more often. Might have to be more aware of the stems location in the rotation of the tire before I check pressure. Maybe if the stem is toward the 4 or 7 o’clock position the stem would drain and not be directly above any pool of sealant.

The cynic in me expects Josh to debut printed titanium stems at $$$ pricing, along the lines of the Reserve ones, with massive internals to get around the issues of sealant ingress. :stuck_out_tongue:

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Sticking with Orange Seal. Foe the past year I have been using CushCore and Vittoria AirLiner inserts. It is a bit of a struggle fest putting them on, not too hard but hard enough that I don’t want to deal with sealant before mounting. Orange Seal recommends topping off the regular formula monthly, and by doing that I haven’t done any special change out (remove tire, clean, reinstall, new sealant) and its worked fine and continued sealing.

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When I put sealant in prior to finishing the seating of the tire, I feel like i lost 25-50% of the fluid

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  • How exactly is it lost?

Sometimes the tire doesnt seat well and it will ooze out when adding air pressure from compressor. Panracers have this issue.

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ABG comment above.

CushCore install video:

Could probably add sealant first, at least in my experience with a 32mm internal rim and 35c gravel tire. Assuming it works, would need to pinch and roll all but the last 1/4 of the bead, then add sealant. I think it would work because in my experience the liner snaps the bead into the rim channel before adding air. In fact I’ve never had to use a compressor with CushCore gravel insert because the insert has already locked in the bead to the rim. But that is likely because of my rim/tire/insert combo.

AirLiner install video:

Every install required using the Vittoria clips, and there is absolutely a gap between rim and tire at bottom (where sealant would be) because to finish the install, I’ve had to make sure the tire bead at bottom (and all around) is out of the rim’s bead channel. This install is always a struggle fest.

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There is no downside to seating without sealant first, the downsides of trying to seat with sealant though… even if you don’t mind the mess you could have wasted quite a bit of sometimes expensive sealant

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the moment you finally get them on and then realize you really do need the special vittoria tubeless valves though and the stock supplied valves won’t do :sob:

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Yeah, I am aware of it as a general issue and have experienced it at times myself. I was asking to see if there was a specific issue (like inflating with the stem towards the floor vs the top of the tire) that I might be able to offer a suggestion.

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The old dried up sealant actually helps seal the tire (and old puntures!) you don’t want to disrupt that stuff