New Cervélo S5 With TT extensions. How good?

Just released from Cervelo and following on from Trek Madones version.

What do you guys think? Does this compare to a P5? Can you dial in TT specific position on the S5 and interchange between road and TT positions. Keen you know your thoughts

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I think it’s a nice compromise if you don’t have the money, space or desire to own a dedicated TT bike. I still don’t think it can be optimised for both TT and road positions at the same time. Saddle position tends to be different for a start, plus I’m not sure the relationship between drops and TT extensions can ever be quite right. It’s a nice clean option for putting TT extensions on without raising stack too much though.

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Yes, these mixed bikes can work. But as mentioned the saddle height and fore-aft for proper road vs TT is different.

The Redshift Sports Switch seatpost is the best solution I have seen to address the issue. It allows instant switching between each position. Great product, but not useful unless you have a round 27.2mm post.

For this or the Madone, you can record the best saddle position for each mode, and just adjust when needed. The next best option is 2 posts with a saddle setup on each, for faster swaps.

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So they really did do it. Just before the 2019 S5 was released there were a few leaks and the TT extensions were one of them. I started to doubt it was legit lately though as it all went quiet.

This makes the S5 a lot more tempting to me. I’m in the process of selling my TT bike. Just can’t see it getting enough use as life just isn’t conducive to TT’ing seriously right now. Something like this though… perfect I think for occasional have a go heroes like me.

Actually think word of this came out before Trek’s bike, and then Trek’s bike ‘leaked’ about a week later IIRC back around Sept/Oct time last year. All very convenient :smiley:

Thing I’m wondering is, is the S5’s geometry designed with using these in mind, or are they just the equivalent of clipping on any old extensions onto any old bike…

Well, I know the Trek stuff was announced a while ago (6 weeks and 4 weeks respectively):

Oh yeah officially, but it leaked last year. Same as the S5 and the extensions…

https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=154219

These bikes are looking like the future. They’ll bring in more riders to TT’ing. They’re starting to run road bike TT’s here in the UK now. Just more accessible and less bikes to maintain. But are they any better than standard clips ons…

  • what about shifting, it’s begging for SRAM to release Blip Clics fully wireless.

So you would need the S5 with Etap and a blip box needs to be installed somewhere, most likely behind the stem on the top tube. Seems like a bit of pain.

You definitely do not want to be switching position to change gears whilst doing a TT. The more I think about it, the more I can see the need for two bikes.

Yeah it’s completely rubbish. Basically SRAM need to step up and offer wireless blips and wireless blip clics compatible with blip box and eTap shifters.

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better still - drop the blip box entirely. It always felt like an interim solution to me. Especially if you use the clics on the extentions. Loads of room for the transmitter and batteries in there.

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I’m just gonna say this here; I don’t really understand the idea behind the Trek Madone TT or the Cervelo S5 TT extension thing. Yeah, if you can’t afford a TT bike, then sure its an option… but these are on the top end race bikes from Trek and Cervelo. Wouldn’t it make more sense to put the TT bars onto their lower end models? I mean if you can afford a Trek Madone/Cervelo S5/S works Venge etc… I think you could afford a used TT or Tri bike. I just don’t really understand the thought behind this. These are on the new models too, so like you could get 2 bikes, a TT and a Race bike (both entry/mid range) which would not limit you on either race distance.

If you cant afford a TT bike… yet you bought the top end Cervelo S5. I do not understand this.

Maybe someone really doesn’t want the hassle of handling 2 bikes? There are use, storage and maintenance requirements when you double up. Not everyone has the space, ability or desire to make that choice (price/budget is not the only consideration here).

Additionally, it is possible that their emphasis is more on road with a small dabble in TT/Tri. I happen to have the freedom and ability to have a road and Tri bike. But, I do a minimal amount of races in either and I could easily see that cutting my stable to one “do-it-all” bike. Choosing the one bike option may be more than enough for their desires and needs.

Sure, it isn’t a perfect solution, but depending on a person’s priorities, I see it as a very valid compromise.

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I’m guessing TT rules are different in other places. But, I think I would prefer to keep the S5 as is and race in the Merckx cat, then covert and try to keep up with a TT cat. In Merckx the S5 could be the best bike at the race. In TT it may be one of the least optimal.

I see the occasional person at a local tri with a top of the line road bike with extensions. The last one I looked up was a cat 1 roadie, so it makes sense he’d have spent that much on his road bike and got some extensions for the occasional tri.

I agree that I do not understand who they are marketing it to otherwise. They seem to be marketed as replacements for high-end TT bikes, which they just are not. No one who takes cycling so seriously that they are looking at an 8-10k bike is going to be fooled into thinking these are the best of both worlds.

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It’s for guys who love posh road bikes and want to do a bit of TT’ing occasionally.

It’s just not kosher to buy a 2k road and 2k TT bike when you’re a roadie who may have a little TT’ing to do, or want to try it out once in a while. For the cost of these extensions, you can ride your dream bike and get a little TT practise in and see how you take to it.

Also think this sort of thing has a growing market with KOM-artists, which, like it or not, is ridiculously competitive now in many areas. `You probably have more chance of winning a local race that you would KOM’ing some local climb or popular segment - in my area, the rolling and flatter segments are KOM’d by TT’ers. These might buy you the couple secs you need to compete if you’ve also got the legs.

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Doesn’t the S5 have an intergrated seat post? That the issue I’m having using a Giant Propel with Aerobars and the specailly designed clip-ons. It mega fast but I’d like to raise the seat more and change the angle for TTing more than I can

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Seat mast designs can be limiting. The Trek ones are about the best because the offer more adjustment range. They also offer seat mast caps with normal and short offsets, that can help get a more forward position.

I mentioned the Redshift post, but also its limitations (27.2mm round) and it will. It work for some of these bikes, unfortunately.

Yeah I think that’s right, they’re just claiming that it’s the perfect bike for most triathletes, which is just untrue. It has a place for sure.

Separately, I do not live somewhere where strava segments are especially competitive, but there is plenty of activity. All of my koms are on my tt bike, it’s just consistently that much faster.

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